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Processed meat linked to cancer; red meat is risky too — WHO

first_imgHealthInternationalLifestylePrint Processed meat linked to cancer; red meat is risky too — WHO by: Associated Press – October 26, 2015 Uncooked pork (file photo)PARIS (AP) — It’s official: Ham, sausage and other processed meats can lead to colon, stomach and other cancers — and red meat is probably cancer-causing too.While doctors have long warned against eating too much meat, the World Health Organization’s cancer agency gave the most definitive response yet Monday about its relation to cancer — and put processed meats in the same danger category as cigarettes or asbestos.A group of 22 scientists from the WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France evaluated more than 800 studies from several continents about meat and cancer.Based on that evaluation, they classified processed meat as “carcinogenic to humans” and red meat as “probably carcinogenic.”Meat industry groups protest the classification. The North American Meat Institute argued in a statement that “cancer is a complex disease not caused by single foods” and stressed the importance of lifestyle and environmental factors.Doctors have warned that a diet loaded with red meat is linked to cancers, including those of the colon and pancreas. The American Cancer Society has long urged people to reduce consumption of red meat and processed meat.The researchers defined processed meat as anything transformed to improve its flavour or preserve it – including salting, curing or smoking.They noted that red meat contains important nutrients but said it was associated with some cancers in several studies. Their report said grilling, pan-frying or other high-temperature methods of cooking red meat produce the highest amounts of chemicals suspected to cause cancer. Share Share Sharing is caring!center_img Share 158 Views   no discussions Tweetlast_img read more

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WDFW Announces Razor Clam Dates Ahead of the Ocean Shores Razor…

first_imgFacebook248Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Razor clam diggers can return to ocean beaches for a two-day opening, March 16-17, which coincides with the Ocean Shores Razor Clam and Seafood Festival in Ocean Shores.State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig on evening low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates, and evening low tides:March 16, Saturday, 3:43 p.m.; 0.3 feet; Twin Harbors Beach, and Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. (see Map)March 17, Sunday, 4:43 p.m.; -0.2 feet; Twin Harbors Beach, and Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. (see Map)“This is a weekend opening that should not be missed,” said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager. “The event features live music, clamming tutorials, clam chowder contests, clam-themed art and cooking demos, and of course, some of the best food you can get with a clam gun or shovel.”For more clamming tips, festival goers can visit Ayres and his shellfish team at their information booth at the event. Ayres will be giving presentations on how to dig razor clams and how WDFW manages the season.Ayres recommends that diggers hit the beach about an hour or two before low tide for the best results.In order to ensure conservation of clams for future generations, WDFW sets tentative razor clam seasons that are based on the results from the annual coast-wide razor clam stock assessment and by considering harvest to date. WDFW authorizes each dig independently after getting the results of marine toxin testing.The Department sets these dates when possible to coincide with the local razor clam festival, knowing the importance it has for the local economy.All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2018-19 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license (starting at $9.70) to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website and from license vendors around the state.Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.More information can be found on WDFW’s razor clam webpage.The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is the primary state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish and wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing and hunting opportunities. WDFW razor clam digs support outdoor lifestyles and coastal economies.Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email ([email protected]). For more information, see https://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html.last_img read more