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Tomas O’Leary – Munster and Ireland

first_imgTAGS: Munster Tomas O’Leary during last year’s Six NationsThe last time we spoke to Tomás O’Leary was during a bad week for the scrum-half. He’d injured his thumb a month into the season and, having undergone surgery, was told he’d miss all four of Ireland’s autumn Tests. The worst thing was he’d suffered the injury while losing to Leinster – a fourth loss in a row to their rivals. The Munsterman was hurting.But now the smile is back on O’Leary’s face. Not one to dwell on the frustration that comes from having to watch your team-mates from the side of the pitch, he took a trip to New York with his girlfriend before returning home to his training routine. Determined to return as soon as possible, he worked hard during his time off, the only thing missing from his regular schedule the games themselves.The effort paid off and in his third game back, O’Leary found himself as Munster’s No 9 for the Heineken Cup clash against the Ospreys in Limerick. Given Peter Stringer’s form for Ireland during the autumn, it was a bold call by Tony McGahan but O’Leary repaid the faith by playing his part in two tries in a 22-16 victory.O’Leary hasn’t played Test rugby since June, but he was glued to his TV screen in the autumn while Ireland followed sluggish defeats by South Africa and New Zealand with a record 29-9 win over Argentina. “It was a bit of a mixed bag,” he says, “and personally frustrating because you want to play every game. Whether you’re watching Munster or Ireland you’d love to be out there. A lot of the lads were really disappointed with the South Africa game, but the conditions dictated that it was difficult to play rugby. They lost to New Zealand as well but that was a pretty good performance, especially when you compare it to how the other countries got on against them. The lads would have been hoping to win all of the games but it’s difficult when you’re playing New Zealand and South Africa.”If things have picked up in recent weeks for O’Leary, he believes Ireland’s fortunes are about to follow suit. Having finished the autumn on a high, they go into the new year optimistic about their chances in the Six Nations. Ireland will enjoy home advantage against France and England, and with Scotland briefly overtaking Ireland in the world rankings in November, the tournament promises to be more competitive than ever.O’Leary knows there’s no substitute for wins for building team confidence, but having a capacity crowd roaring them on at the Aviva Stadium wouldn’t half help too. Ireland struggled to fill their seats in November, with tickets sold in expensive packages, and the Lansdowne Road atmosphere of old was missed by all. O’Leary hopes a revised ticketing policy will get bums firmly back on seats. “It’s really important that we get as many fans as possible in the stadium to get behind us. A good atmosphere improves people’s performances so hopefully for the Six Nations we can get a full crowd into the Aviva. It would be good to get a good few results to give the crowd something to cheer about too. Every game will be tough, it’s not going to be an easy Six Nations. Scotland are going well and the Italians are too, which they showed when Aironi beat Biarritz.”With a World Cup in the back of every player’s mind, competition for places will be tough, and Declan Kidney will also have his eye on Stringer, Eoin Reddan and Isaac Boss this month. O’Leary has been first choice when fit in recent times, but he’s not become complacent about his standing within the squad, and is hoping that a bit of friendly rivalry will spark a run of success for the team.“I’m training hard and I’d be disappointed if I don’t get back in, but it does happen,” he says. “The Six Nations will be the last window for players aiming to get into the World Cup squad so it’s going to be ultra-competitive, which will hopefully improve our performances. There will be games where others get opportunities, and not every player will face every opposition. I’m looking forward to playing myself, but it’s good for the lads to get a run and get a chance.”Before the Six Nations and subsequent World Cup, O’Leary will be engaged in Munster’s Heineken Cup and Magners League campaigns this month. The 27-year-old is in his sixth season for the province, with another one left on his contract after this – and is showing no signs of wanting to move on from Thomond Park. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “I don’t really think about the World Cup too much, especially as I haven’t been involved with Ireland recently. I haven’t been to a World Cup before so I definitely want to go to one with Ireland, but if I think about it then the immediate future will go out of my mind, and you can’t let that happen. I’ve just been aiming to get back there with Munster, this is a fairly massive season for us. I’m pretty happy here at the moment. It’s a great place to play rugby with great professionals, and if you’re playing regularly for Munster you’re in with a shot for the Irish team.”Fans will no doubt be delighted to see O’Leary back on the pitch, and will hope his cheery disposition translates into tangible rewards for Munster and Ireland.last_img read more

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New France kit revealed – Video

first_imgThe complete collection will be available to buy from 1st August 2011 and fans can pre-order from today.  Visit www.nikestore.com/rugby LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Thierry Dusatoir and Imanol Harinordoquy model the 2011 France KitIt certainly is the week for new rugby kits as World Cup fever starts to build across the globe. The home kit is a combination of both royal and dark blue, inspired by the jerseys worn by the French Rugby team for two great victories over the All Blacks in 1999 and 2007. In addition, both kits feature the motif ‘France’ on the inside of the shirts, a tricolour trim and a 3D grip zone on the chest to enhance ball grip.Meanwhile the new change kit is white and sky blue, using the same asymmetric blending of colours as the home kit to create a shirt that is sleek in its design.The jerseys are engineered to improve athlete performance; with an innovative tight fit design to aid movement and Nike Dri-FIT technology to keep players cool and comfortable on-pitch. The design inspiration celebrates French rugby heritage whilst being modern in style.center_img The French will their typical swagger launched their new, very traditional, Nike kit with a high quality video. Watch it below and let us know what you think of the new kit. Will it help them beat New Zealand in the pool stages in the World Cup?Check out the launch here…last_img read more

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Never did I think I could conquer Kili – Andy Blyth

first_imgWe set off at midnight for the summit push, and I arrived at 8.15am. At the top I put my head in my hands and slumped into a bit of a heap and had a blub. I couldn’t speak, most people welled up, and there was a good bit of man-hugging!That first shower was the greatest shower I’ve ever had. It was up there with the first shower I had in hospital after I broke my neck, after five months of bed baths, but it was better, because I had more feeling.I can’t believe I’ve actually climbed Mount Kilimanjaro. If someone had suggested it a few years ago I’d have laughed. I’m now going to move to Holland, or somewhere where there are no hills! This is the best I’ve felt since I hurt myself, and I’m grateful to AXA Wealth for sponsoring my trip. I’m game for the next one, I’ve got the bug now!This article appeared in the August 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS [imagebrowser id=14]Eleven years after my accident, it still takes me a bit of time to get going in the mornings, and I’ve got constant pain due to muscle imbalance, so I wasn’t the typical candidate to climb Mount Kilimanjaro.I’d been getting stronger, though, and wanted to give something back to the Rugby Players’ Association (RPA), who had looked after and supported me and my family for so long. At the RPA’s annual dinner 13 months ago, David Barnes (the RPA chairman) and Tim Nicholls (their Head of Player Development) were talking about this trip, which was in its embryonic stages, and after a couple of drinks I said, “I could do that!”At the time I don’t think I could have walked a mile. But I thought ‘Why not just go for it?’, and threw myself into the training. I got up religiously Monday to Friday at 6.20am. I’d been going to the gym but there was no end product like there is with a match, so having that carrot at the end was a mad motivating factor. Knowing I was going to be with other people, the last thing I wanted was to turn up undercooked, unable to do it, and slow people down. I would have felt horrific.I was fairly shy on the first night. Everyone had a few beers whereas I just had a couple and went to bed. I was just so nervous of letting anyone down. Being a ball and chain on everyone’s leg would have been a nightmare for me.We were split into groups of six but we mixed up, so on different days you’d walk with different people. Everyone was jolly on the first night because we weren’t too tired. The next night you’re a lot higher, so you get to camp and just want your food and to crash out. After that it’s just eat, walk, sleep. Once you’re above cloud level the temperature plummets at night. It ranged from 35° at the bottom to -15° at the top.Unfortunately I had to share a tent with Barnsey. There were lots of pungent aromas after seven days of no showering and living with a prop, and he kept trying to get closer to me at night! He was also up every hour and a half to go for a pee! The mattresses weren’t bad but a lot of the time there were rocks underneath you, though at times that became secondary to just how tired you were. I didn’t sleep well for the whole trip but that’s nothing new.center_img Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visitlast_img read more

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The Championship Blog – Week 6 round-up

first_imgSo after all the week six action, the table looks like this…Follow Richard Grainger on Twitter @Maverickwriter The Falcons notched up their fifth bonus point win, with last season’s out-of-sorts finalists, the Cornish Pirates, the only side to deny them a maximum haul.Moseley, who beat Bristol in round five, had no answer to the Premiership contenders’ pace and finishing.Head Coach Dean Richards wasn’t totally satisfied and told the Falcons’ website: “I don’t think we were as slick as we have been in the backline but we will look at that and work on it – to come down here and win by more than 50 points is a very good result”.You would have been offered good odds against Bristol lying fourth from bottom six weeks into the season.In a scrappy affair at Clifton Lane on Saturday, Bristol went down 23-16 to Rotherham. The visitors held the lead briefly early in the second half, when David McIlwaine ran in under the posts following a fine handling move.However, a yellow card for Kyle Traynor led to numerous infringements at the scrum by the Bristol pack and left referee Mr John Meredith with no option other than to run beneath the posts.Finally, Leeds Carnegie’s topsy-turvy season continued with the 42-7 thrashing of neighbours Doncaster at Headingley on Sunday.In the last game before the Headingley pitch is re-turfed, Sam Lockwood and Curtis Wilson bagged a brace of tries for Leeds and Christian Georgiou and Jamel Chisholm and touched down.Doncaster weren’t helped by having to play three quarters of the game with 14 men when referee Mr Greg Macdonald showed Adam Kettle a red card for a dump tackle. By Richard GraingerNOTTINGHAM TRADED places with Plymouth and moved into third in the Championship by virtue of a 48-16 win over Jersey, at Meadow Lane on Friday.The Green and Whites were firing on all cylinders, with tries from Andy Savage, Rhys Crane and a double effort from Alex Shaw. Despite slick handling from the visitors they were unlucky to come away from the East Midlands without greater reward for their efforts, Nottingham were always in control, leading 20-3 after only 10 minutes.Jersey, who have yet to win a game, stayed within 10 points until Shaw scored his second. When Jersey prop Ben Evans was sent to the sin bin, their scrum creaked and Nottingham forced the visitors to concede a penalty try.Bedford Blues are still just two points behind the Falcons who top the table after demolishing Plymouth 55-17 at Goldington Road on Saturday. Mike Rayer’s men were simply too strong for the visitors and ran in eight tries.Plymouth went into the match with only one previous defeat, and that by the narrow margin of two points to the Cornish Pirates. Forwards Sam Hocking and Jon Vickers managed tries for Albion but unbeaten Bedford were always in control.A last minute Phil Godman penalty sent the London Scottish faithful home happy at the Athletic Ground on Saturday.It was a case of villain turned hero for Exiles’ flanker Chevvy Pennycock who was sent to the sin bin after only 90 seconds as the Pirates took the lead with a converted try from Ben Maidment.However, the flanker redeemed himself with a brace of tries plus a late unconverted try from skipper Mark Bright brought the hosts back from 10-24 deficit to set up a tense finale.However, the Exiles dominated possession from the re-start causing the Pirates to concede a penalty on their 10-metre line. Godman was on target, moving the Exiles above the Pirates in the table.Newcastle recorded their second consecutive 50-pointer, this time at Moseley’s expense, winning 13-53 at Billesley Common on Saturday.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Analysis: How Scott Fardy and Jerome Kaino could decide the Rugby World Cup final

first_imgRevelling in the ‘unseen’ exchanges, blindside flankers Scott Fardy and Jerome Kaino will be inconspicuous but integral performers for Australia and New Zealand during Saturday’s Rugby World Cup decider. Exactly two months ago, Justin Tipuric derailed Ireland in Dublin, making a compelling case to be deployed in tandem with Wales skipper Sam Warburton. Across the globe, a double-team of David Pocock and Michael Hooper had just handed New Zealand a comprehensive defeat in Sydney.On the eve of the World Cup, it seemed the tournament would hinge on how many traditional openside flankers a coach can shoehorn into a starting team.To some extent, this hunch has transpired. Back-row dynamism and breakdown nous have proved pivotal. England paid dearly for their relative inferiority in these areas. But some stand-out performers have also reinforced the value of an old-fashioned, unfussy blindside to fuse everything together and facilitate more eye-catching performances.Dan Lydiate delivered a couple of brilliant defensive displays. Schalk Burger was the heartbeat of South Africa’s resurgence. In the final, two crucial protagonists – Scott Fardy and Jerome Kaino – will be wearing six.The term ‘unseen work’ is almost redundant these days due to the advent of video analysis and all-access broadcasting. That said, it is certainly worth taking a look at the more inconspicuous interventions of Fardy and Kaino ahead of Saturday’s decider.Scott FardyDisrupting at the restartWe will begin with the bearded Wallaby, and some aspects of his efforts at the restart – an element that has long been as important as a third set piece.Australia led 19-9 at half-time against Argentina in their semi-final. The next score was crucial. Track Fardy as Bernard Foley begins the second period. He starts on the left of the line……and charges up to cause havoc as Santiago Cordero takes the ball:Drew Mitchell and Michael Hooper reach the Pumas wing first, and hold him in an attempt to form a maul. Though the likes of Marcos Ayerza and Leonard Senatore create some impetus with a counter-drive, Fardy comes in and hooks his arms over the top, targeting the ball:Through sheer, long-limbed awkwardness he manages to strip it before turning his body and dropping to ground:Fardy places the ball back and Cordero fails to rolls clear of the contact area. Referee Wayne Barnes awards a penalty to Australia:Five minutes later, after Argentina had pulled back three points, Foley again aims a restart towards Cordero. Once more, Fardy stunted a Pumas exit play:This is a classic tackle-jackal. The Brumbies back-rower shackles his man…… and bounces back to his feet before the supporting Pablo Matera can blow over the ball to form a ruck. Barnes rules that no breakdown has been formed, meaning Fardy can attack the ball from the rear:Plucking it out of a pile of bodies, he is eager to turn defence into attack and pops a pass back to franchise colleague and Test captain Stephen Moore:Australia are an exceptionally slick breakdown side and Fardy is a key cog.Ruck smartsSome of the most effective breakdown play does not encompass a clean steal. This short passage, with Argentina well on top, begins with a fine defensive decision from Fardy:Scrambling back following an initial break from Jeronimo de la Fuente, Australia are in real strife. Scrum-half Tomas Cubelli finds Juan Figallo, who has six men to his left and just three Wallabies in front of him:The normal course of action for Australia in this situation would be to employ a ‘soft drift’ and shepherd Argentina towards the touchline. However, Fardy goes entirely against convention.Perhaps looking to pressurise the skills of Figallo, a tighthead prop, at first receiver, he rushes up to stop the movement at source:And his work is not finished either. Track the back and green scrum cap on this ensuing phase:While Fardy does not snatch possession or force a penalty, his clawing over the ball slows Argentina’s ruck-speed. Cordero does clear him, but by the time Cubelli is ready to instigate the next phase, the Australia fringe defence is primed and ready:Pocock – in the driving seat for World Player of the Year – has won 14 turnovers during this tournament, five ahead of Fiji lock Leone Nakarawa in second place.  Fardy only has five turnovers attributed to him.However, here is an example of him assisting Pocock in nabbing the ball:As Matera curves around the fringes and is felled by Kane Douglas, Pocock swoops onto the ball. Fardy arcs behind him……and latches on:This effectively galvanises Pocock with 110 kilograms of weight, making him harder to shift and therefore buying time to haul the ball back towards the Australia side.The role of facilitator, the man that knuckles down to allow colleagues to shine, is often spoken about in intangible terms. Fardy’s actions here offer evidence of how intelligent industry can help others to be showered with praise.When the Wallabies have the ball, he provides similarly modest contributionsAttack, set piece and referee managementFardy’s work-rate is mammoth and he often provides an outlet in attack on the shoulder of a carrier. Returning to another restart situation – in fact, to the opening kick-off of the clash against Argentina – we can highlight an important part of his game.As Nicolas Sanchez gets the game going, Fardy (circled) tracks back towards the ball alongside James Slipper, who had been in position to lift him if the kick had come left, and Rob Simmons:While Tevita Kuridrani fields the ball and takes it into contact, Fardy moves to first receiver and aids a slick exit play:A pass to Matt Giteau in behind the primary wave of runners, after engaging the gain-line defence, helps Australia to open up the right-hand side of the field……and from there Foley can use his right boot to blast downfield.Fardy is also an important option at the lineout. Given New Zealand will look to challenge on the Wallabies throw, wins such as this one could prove vital:Finally, while Saturday sees just a 30th cap for Fardy, he is an authoritative figure who speaks to officials a great deal.This Australia campaign has been littered with defining moments, none more so than the penalty awarded by Craig Joubert in the dying minutes of victory over Scotland:At the point the South African referee blows his whistle, look at Fardy:He resembles a fast bowler, bent at the knees, arms aloft and imploring Joubert to give the decision. Although these scenes are rather unsavoury, they also epitomise two of Fardy’s innate attributes as a player – persistence and competitiveness.And now for his opposite number.Jerome KainoIntimidation from the outsetRobust and imposing, Kaino is a different specimen to the lanky, lithe Fardy. He functions in a more abrasive style, but remains a master of unheralded graft. As with Fardy though, a restart highlights his ability to unsettle.This clip comes after South Africa had gone 3-0 up in last Saturday’s semi. Kaino charges up to clatter Willie Le Roux:From there, he rolls away from the ruck and springs to his feet……taking his position in the defensive line: LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Playing to the whistle – as every youngster is taught within their first few sessions – he carries into contact. New Zealand scored from the next phase, capitalising on the penalty advantage to take seven points rather than three.The final may well be decided by such moments. Fardy and Kaino will be fighting tooth and nail for the most marginal gains.center_img Dirty work: Hard men Scott Fardy and Jerome Kaino go head-to-head on Saturday Credit: Getty Images In harness with Aaron Smith, Kaino then tears up with rapid line-speed. The pressure of an attempted charge-down coerces Handre Pollard into a poor clearance:On the point of contact, Kaino is right up in the fly-half’s face:And New Zealand end up with a lineout just outside the Springbok 22:The All Blacks could continue to probe the South Africa defence and, eventually, an opportunity arose. Guess who was on hand to brush off Lood de Jager and finish it off:It was clearly a pre-ordained strategy for New Zealand to make it difficult for South Africa to get out of their own half.Following another first-half Pollard penalty, Kaino was rushing up again, forcing a hurried, left-footed clearance that encourages a counter:Now to examine the contact area. Alongside Brodie Retallick, Kaino is New Zealand’s chief enforcer.Collision kingSouth Africa undoubtedly disturbed the All Blacks out of sheer tenacity and power. Kaino stood up to the barrage though. Track him here as the Springboks mount a midfield attack:Kaino spots his runner early……drifting up and out, trusting Dane Coles to take Burger……before wrapping up the ball in a sternum-level hit on Louw:Dragging the carrier back to ground on the New Zealand side, Kaino allows Kieran Read a chance to stoop……and get over the ball. Although Kaino is clearly trying to roll away, du Preez is not pleased……but, despite more protestations from the likes of Burger, Jerome Garces rules a 50-50 call in New Zealand’s favour:This amounts to another turnover assist – prime currency for blindside flankers.Though Kaino suffered a brain explosion late in the first period and was sent to the sin bin, he made a telling contribution on his return.We begin with a defensive scrum for South Africa:Duane Vermeulen trucks up from the base, Richie McCaw and Read bring the No 8 down and Kaino circles around to the guard position:Burger is the next to take a pass from du Preez:Engulfed by Kaino……Burger suffers the ignominy of having the ball ripped from his grasp by Dan Carter:New Zealand did not relinquish possession until Beauden Barrett had scored to make it 17-12.Finally, a glance at what Kaino brings in attack.Carrying, clearing and opportunismIn terms of crossing the gain-line in an uncomplicated manner, Kaino is a go-to man. We pick up the South Africa clash in the first half as Kieran Read has stolen a lineout:Positioned in midfield, Kaino calls for the pass from Aaron Smith……and, propelled by Coles and McCaw, makes inroads through Burger and Eben Etzebeth:Later in the same movement, du Preez was floored by the big Auckland Blue:Kaino was superb during the 62-13 quarter-final thrashing of France, scoring in an ubiquitous display. To underline his under-the-radar excellence though, watch the beginning of Julian Savea’s phenomenal second try.Carter goes to the air, and the outstanding Ben Smith recovers:However, he is isolated from support and surrounded by French defenders looking to tackle him and swarm the ball.Watch who comes to the rescue:Given what we have seen above from Fardy, Hooper and Pocock, New Zealand’s attacking breakdown will be crucial on Saturday. Here, Kaino storms in from nowhere. He hits the ruck hard……scattering Wesley Fofana and Scott Spedding with the help of McCaw to present a pristine platform for Aaron Smith:The scrum-half finds Retallick with Savea lurking……and the rest is history:The last example of Kaino’s value is rather understated. It comes following a deliberate knock-on from Bryan Habana:While Aaron Smith and Carter are making a point to the referee, Kaino only has eyes for the ball:last_img read more

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Wales lift the Triple Crown – now for the Grand Slam?

first_img TAGS: Highlight People have described Wales’ 2021 run as ‘lucky’, following the red cards against the opposition in their wins over Ireland and Scotland then the controversial tries in this match.Firstly, I think ‘luck’ is probably an inappropriate word when referring to the red cards given those sendings off relate to protecting players from brain injury. Secondly, Wales have shown a steely mentality to grind out wins in those opening games and then had the smarts to do the same in Cardiff.Wales certainly don’t look as good a side as France currently – not many teams do right now – but here’s a positive omen for Wales fans: Cory Hill also scored a try against England when Wales completed the clean sweep in 2019. Wales lift the Triple Crown – now for the Grand Slam?Rugby smarts. Rugby is so often viewed as a battle of brawn but it was brains that proved decisive as Wales beat England 40-24 in this Six Nations fixture in Cardiff.Yes, there was controversy over Wales’ two first-half tries – more of which later – but the hosts won this match, and with it the Triple Crown, in the closing 20 minutes, not the first 30.When England drew level through a Ben Youngs try, converted by Owen Farrell, midway through the second half, they looked in a strong position to close out a win and get their title bid back on track.Instead, a succession of penalties allowed Wales to not only relieve pressure in their own half but pull clear on the scoreboard as Callum Sheedy was only too happy to bisect the posts – and they finished with a flourish when Cory Hill scored a bonus-point try.Callum Sheedy kicked 13 points (Getty Images)Had England kept calm and built pressure, rather than trying to force things, it could be them going into their final two games with the trophy in their sights. Now it’s Wales who should see off Italy in round four and head to Paris in a few weeks bidding for yet another Grand Slam – they already have more of those than any other team in the Six Nations era.Discipline, or lack thereof, was a problem for England against Scotland in their opening fixture and it was again here as they conceded 14 penalties to Wales’ nine – five of them from Maro Itoje. They can feel hard done by when it comes to those first-half try decisions but that is not where the game was won and lost.Matt Dawson’s description of the late flurry of offences as “verging on mindless” on BBC Radio 5Live seemed apt. Similar accusations have been levelled at England when it comes to their tactics and inability to adapt, to find different ways of breaking down opponents when breaking through them doesn’t work. Rather than think their way out of trouble, they played their way into it, continually being pinged by the referee.Ben Youngs’s try saw England draw level (Getty Images)The irony is that England looked more dangerous in Cardiff than they have for months, their attacking game sparking into life. Criticised for their dependency on the boot in recent months, it was their handling that stood out in this match. They still kicked a fair bit – and with more variety – but it was with ball in hand that they looked most dangerous.Quick hands along the line saw them push deep into Wales’ territory, albeit that Jonny May was marshalled well by Louis Rees-Zammit and George North. It was one of these fluid movements that led to Youngs dummying over and momentum appeared to be with the visitors – but then came penalty after penalty, Wales took advantage and Alun Wyn Jones lifted the Triple Crown.Controversial calls Back to those try decisions. The first one came when Pascal Gauzere gave Owen Farrell time to talk to his players about the number of penalties being conceded – but not too much time. As soon as Gauzere called ‘time on’, Dan Biggar kicked crossfield while England were still chatting under the posts and Josh Adams plucked the ball out of the air to score.It’s easy to see why Farrell remonstrated with Gauzere afterwards but the referee had called time back on and England should have been more aware of what was happening 20 metres away, keeping an eye on the official’s signals and the opposition’s movements. There’s always a danger in assuming a team will kick for goal from a penalty; you have to stay alert. The second one they can feel more aggrieved by. Rees-Zammit’s failure to gather an Adams kick wasn’t ruled a knock-on by the TMO, so Liam Williams’s subsequent try stood – but it seemed only the officials didn’t see a knock-on. Even Rees-Zammit looked surprised at the call.Rugby is a game of nuances and grey areas but, in my view, that was the wrong decision. Rugby World’s verdict on a match full of drama at the Principality Stadium To reiterate, though, it wasn’t those decisions that lost England the game. They actually reacted positively to get themselves back in contention, an Anthony Watson try and a Farrell penalty making it 17-14 at half-time.They switched off in the 48th minute when Kieran Hardy took a quick tap to dart over – one of the first things you learn in rugby is not to turn your back and a few England players did just that – but again they came back. At 24-24 England looked the more likely to go on and win, but all those infringements mounted up as they looked almost too eager to get the next score. Rather than a steady, methodical approach, their ill-discipline released the pressure on Wales, who were able to close out the game.Related: Eddie Jones reacts to England’s defeat by WalesNow for a Grand Slam?How quickly things can change in rugby. Wales came into this championship with many predicting a fifth-place finish, but instead they will go to Rome in two weeks confident of making it four wins from four.It’s all building up nicely to a Grand Slam ‘decider’ in Paris, although who knows if France will have played their four games by then with such uncertainty around the rescheduling of the Scotland fixture. Wales have won there before in 2005 and 2019 en route to Slams – can they do it for the third time this year? Wales captain Alun Wyn Jones holds the Triple Crown after the 40-24 win over England (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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‘Nuevas visiones’ de comunidades de fe y centros de misión

first_img‘Nuevas visiones’ de comunidades de fe y centros de misión La Oficina del Ministerio de los Negros se asocia a otras congregaciones a través de la Iniciativa de Nuevas Visiones. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Por Pat McCaughanPosted Jun 11, 2012 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA [Episcopal News Service] “Avivamiento” puede ser una “palabra incómoda” en la Iglesia Episcopal, pero es una manera en que la Iniciativa de Nuevas Visiones de la Oficina del Ministerio de los Negros de la Iglesia Episcopal está ayudando a reenergizar algunas congregaciones.Crear relaciones, redescubrir la misión e incluso hacer sencillos cambios de lenguaje son otras. Tales como cambiar la conciencia de “ser congregaciones a convertirse en comunidades de fe que se esfuerzan por convertirse en centros de misión”, dijo la Rda. Angela Ifill, misionera para la Oficina del Ministerio de los Negros, durante una entrevista telefónica.“Nos hemos visto y nos hemos definido como congregaciones durante tanto tiempo que se ha hecho una rutina, del mismo modo que orar puede llegar a ser algo rutinario”, subrayó Ifill, quien puso en marcha el proyecto experimental Iniciativa de Nuevas Visiones [NVI, por su sigla en inglés] en 2009. En la actualidad, ocho congregaciones participan en este proyecto.El empeño asocia a iglesias afroamericanas que históricamente han tenido dificultades con iglesias que han sido prósperas para ayudar a redescubrir la misión y llevar adelante el cambio. Ifill espera agregar otras cuatro [congregaciones] adicionales en 2012, a las que se les pide que participen por lo menos durante 18 meses.“Si podemos considerarnos como comunidades de fe, nos moveremos de ese concepto totalmente pasivo de congregación para convertirnos en comunidades de misión, entendiendo… que la razón de ser es estar en el mundo, dando lugar a la misión de Dios y no sólo como una congregación que viene a la iglesia el domingo por la mañana y todo lo que hacemos es concentrarnos interiormente”, afirmó.Significa correr riesgos y hacer cambios, incluso adaptando culturas, tales como la de auspiciar avivamientos, por ejemplo.“A nuestras iglesias se les ha pedido que planeen avivamientos. Al principio, hubo alguna duda que nos llevó a fijarnos en lo que llamamos ‘palabras incómodas’”, explica Ifill. “Cuando la gente oye mencionar la palabra ‘avivamiento’ se pregunta, ‘¿avivamiento en la Iglesia Episcopal?’“Pero, ¿por qué no? Tenemos evangelización, mayordomía, pero con frecuencia palabras tales como ‘renacido’, ‘avivamiento’, ‘testificar’, hace que la gente se sienta incómoda. Preguntamos el porqué estas palabras tienen ese efecto en ustedes y estamos teniendo alguna discusión teológica en torno a eso”, añadió.Recientemente, dos noches de avivamiento en la iglesia de San Simón de Cirene [St. Simon of Cyrene] en Lincoln Heights, Ohio, motivó a Ethelrine Shaw-Nickerson a ofrecer un testimonio espontáneo durante los oficios dominicales regulares del Día de Pentecostés.“No tuve nada más que alabanzas. Fue maravilloso, hermoso, espiritual, un evento con gran participación de la gente que me recordaba los viejos tiempos de los avivamientos en la Iglesia Bautista, pero con ese sabor episcopal”, dijo Nickerson durante una entrevista telefónica desde su casa cerca de Cincinnati.“El tema fue hacer todas las cosas nuevas”, añadió. “La primera noche tuvimos más de 200 personas; la segunda noche hubo unas 150, y alimentamos a todo el mundo la segunda noche. No sabíamos cómo íbamos a alimentar a toda esa gente, pero Dios nos trajo abundancia de pan y abundancia de pescado e incluso nos sobró alguna comida. Fue estupendo”.El auspiciar avivamientos comunitarios es sólo uno de los muchos cambios que se iniciaran desde que San Simón se uniera a la Iniciativa de Nuevas Visiones, dijo el Rdo. Trevor Babb, el rector.“Éste es el tercer avivamiento que hemos hecho y es mayor cada año”, dijo Babb durante una entrevista telefónica desde su oficina. “Cuando empezamos hace tres años, hubo unas 40 personas. Este año lo expandimos a dos días y la iglesia se llenó con personas que trascendían las barreras denominacionales”.El proyecto experimental ha dado lugar a una nueva energía en el culto, expresó él.Localizada en un barrio cambiante, con un promedio de asistencia dominical de 90 personas con una edad promedio de 55 años, [la iglesia de] San Simón tenía 81 años y se encontraba “en un momento de transición y en busca de un modo de energizar a nuestra congregación”, dijo Babb. “Pero, necesitábamos instrumentos para hacerlo”.La Iniciativa de Nuevas Visiones asoció a San Simón con la iglesia episcopal de San Andrés y la Santa Comunión [St. Andrew and Holy Communion] en South Orange, Nueva Jersey, una congregación multinacional y multiétnica con 152 años de existencia y un promedio de asistencia dominical de 250 personas.La asociación ha incluido el compartir materiales de desarrollo litúrgico y congregacional “y hemos aprendido mutuamente”, dijo la Rda. Canóniga Sandye Wilson, rectora de la congregación de Nueva Jersey.“Nuevas visiones nos ha ayudado a concentrarnos en nuestra misión”, añadió Wilson. “Este es un modelo para el futuro en una Iglesia postmoderna, cuando nos esforzamos en concebir la manera de responder a las necesidades de nuestras comunidades y cómo llevar la Iglesia a la gente. Ello da testimonio del poder de las asociaciones de compañerismo con muchos kilómetros de por medio y nos facilita un modo de mirar y experimentar a otros”.Ifill dijo que las congregaciones empezaron por crear una oración de Nuevas Visiones para uso de ambas iglesias compañeras durante el culto. También deciden temas específicos que abordar, usualmente que conlleven el discipulado y la enseñanza, porque nos concentramos en una formación cristiana que dura toda la vida”.Las asociaciones conllevan también intercambios de bancos y de púlpitos y la creación de relaciones más allá de fronteras geográficas o de otro tipo. En abril, Wilson predicó en la iglesia de Lincoln Heights.“Otro asunto es el participar en el desarrollo de un proyecto de misión”, añadió Ifill. “También, con el proyecto de misión, se les pide que se adentren en sus comunidades, que den una vuelta [por ellas], que conozcan a la gente, que se enteren de lo que está pasando y cómo pueden ser parte de lo que está pasando”.El 6 de junio, Babb comenzó “localizar recursos”, a equiparar los dones y recursos de la congregación con las necesidades de la comunidad local.La NVI “nos ha dado realmente una nueva visión, sin querer hacer un juego de palabras”, afirmó. “Debemos ser más que argamasa y ladrillos en la comunidad. Debemos conmover a la comunidad en algunos aspectos específicos y la NVI nos ha ayudado a cristalizar algunos de los planes que estamos poniendo en práctica. Ha sido un catalizador para nosotros cambiar nuestra estructura para ayudarnos a encarnar nuestra misión”.Algunos cambios funcionan, otros no tanto, dijo Ifill. Viejas discrepancias congregacionales y problemas inesperados sí salen a la superficie y tenemos que lidiar con ellos, mediante la oración, mediante la reconciliación -lo cual conduce a un nuevo desarrollo, agregó.Reuniones de toda la Iglesia como Todos en Todas Partes, que tuviera lugar en Estes Park, Colorado, en octubre y la Reunión de la Nueva Comunidad, en San Diego [California] en marzo, le dieron oportunidad a los participantes de congregarse.La NVI también ha inspirado una actividad musical [ “Singspiration”],” una sesión coral previa al oficio y concebida “para lograr que la gente venga a la iglesia más temprano y comience a adorar con una mejor actitud”, dijo Frank Carr, miembro del comité de liderazgo del NVI de San Simón.El compañerismo ha sido “contagioso dentro de la vida de la congregación”, agregó. “No creo que haya nadie en nuestra congregación que diga que no entiende de qué se trata. Por primera vez, hemos puesto a la NVI con un renglón del presupuesto y hemos dedicado un espacio importante de nuestra página web a ofrecer información sobre el proyecto”.Para Trevor Bryan III, miembro de la iglesia de San Lucas [St. Luke’s] en Nueva Orleáns, al asociarse con la histórica iglesia episcopal africana de Santo Tomás [St. Thomas] de Filadelfia, la NVI “puede servir como modelo, no sólo para iglesias negras, sino para otras iglesias que pudieran estar en decadencia. Podría aplicarse a cualquier grupo étnico. Ha sido bueno para nosotros”.Ethelrine Shaw-Nickerson, de la iglesia de San Simón, está de acuerdo.Ella ya espera otro avivamiento en la iglesia de Lincoln Heights porque este más reciente suscitó “algunos cambios con el grupo más joven” -cambios por los cuales ella se sentía tan agradecida que se sintió motivada a dar un testimonio.“Hermanó a la gente de una manera nueva”, recordó. “A mí me sorprendió. No sabía cómo íbamos a alimentar a las personas, pero de repente yo estaba aquí en la cocina y los jóvenes empezaron a traer bandejas de verduras y postres, y nos sobró muchísima comida”.El Domingo de Pentecostés ella compartió ese entusiasmo con otros feligreses. “Dije que Dios estaba con nosotros. Que Dios nos había ayudado a hacer lo que debíamos hacer y que yo quería manifestar mi gratitud por lo que había sucedido en nuestra iglesia”.— La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service y radica en Los Ángeles. Traducido por Vicente Echerri.En inglés: http://bit.ly/NklFy9 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

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Meredyth Wessman Ward appointed Urban Missioner for Worcester

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Rev. Meredyth Wessman Ward has been appointed Urban Missioner for Worcester by the Rt. Rev. Douglas J. Fisher, IX bishop of Western Massachusetts. Click here to read more. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Meredyth Wessman Ward appointed Urban Missioner for Worcester AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI People Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Jan 5, 2015 last_img read more

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General Convention wrap-up: Historic actions, structural changes

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Joseph F Foster says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 7, 2015 at 6:38 pm A fresh re-examination of scripture may also be in order, with careful attention to the historical/cultural context of the various texts influencing your choices. General Convention, July 7, 2015 at 2:31 pm I share Mr. Barker’s sentiments. I’m so sorry our church has evolved in this way. I am deeply concerned as to how to proceed in my faith walk. I shall give it prayerful consideration but will most likely be leaving the church that I’ve loved so well for 35 yrs. July 8, 2015 at 2:47 pm Joe,You are correct that there is a desire to re-write the interpretation of what is meant by Holy Matrimony. It is being advanced, despite the Holy Scriptures, Tradition and Reason that has guided the Anglican Communion. It has led many to abandon the Episcopal Church in search for the Christian Faith. Reimaging the Episcopal Church may or may not lead to a better understanding, but, it may lead to extermination. I hope that there will be few of us who cherish the church and will revive the past understanding of what marriage is and will always be held appropriate as a god defined marriage between two persons…man and a woman. Associate Rector Columbus, GA July 8, 2015 at 12:50 pm Mr. Barker, I am sorry that you feel conflicted about The Episcopal Church. I know the pain of being a minority, of feeling unaccepted and unacceptable by my Church. It is terrible, and I will pray that you never feel what many of us have felt. Scripture has been misappropriated to justify many atrocities, including slavery and misogyny. You write that you love, cherish and welcome your LGBT friends, and I believe you. Yet it seems that love is quite conditional. You would seat them at the back of the “Sacramental bus” when it comes to marriage. Jesus’ said, “‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind.’ This is the greatest and first commandment. And a second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.” (Matthew 22: 37-40) Nowhere in the commandment do I find that LGBT people are excluded from the neighbors we are called to love as ourselves. I fail to see how we can love LGBT people and deny them a Sacrament that heterosexuals enjoy. I’ve been pondering whether the Church should offer only blessings of marriages and get out of the legal contract part altogether, thus giving Caesar what is Caesar’s. But if heterosexual couples can be legally wed in the Church, then surely unconditional love, as described by Jesus in Matthew, demands equal treatment of LGBT brothers and sisters. You are right, Mr. Barker, The Episcopal Church you took your vows in 42 years ago has changed. I believe She is following Jesus’ two greatest commandments. Thanks be to God. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID July 7, 2015 at 9:25 pm “Bishops led a march against gun violence”They marched but how did they vote on the resolutions? Why didn’t the tell us? Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest July 7, 2015 at 11:17 pm And yet, marriage equality in The Episcopal Church will mean I will leave The UMC and come to The Episcopal Church… God certainly is mysterious. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tim Kunkel says: Charles W. Daily says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Mark Barwick says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 James Michie says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Louis Stanley Schoen says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments (15) July 8, 2015 at 9:02 pm I can only look at the issue of gay marriage and ask, “What difference does it make to me if two people of the same sex want to marry.” It will not change my life one iota but gives others solace. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 9, 2015 at 1:45 am I always find its deliciously ironic when people speak of “rewriting the Bible as it pertains to Holy Matrimony,” as the Bible does not even contain such language. Indeed, we are challenged to even construct anything resembling a biblical theology of marriage.Such ruminations sadly remind me of similar discussions around race when I was a boy. When will we be able to accept that the creation is much more diverse and fluid that we had previously thought? An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET July 9, 2015 at 3:54 pm Regarding DO16 substitute resolution “Being Responsible investors in Israel and Palestine”, this article’s author writes, “The House of Bishops sent a strong and clear message July 2 that divestment from companies and corporations engaged in certain business related to the State of Israel is not in the best interests of The Episcopal Church, its partners in the Holy Land, interreligious relations, and the lives of Palestinians on the ground.” What a strange use of language! The resolution did not call for divestment from companies engaged in “businesses related to the State of Israel”. The resolution called for divestment from businesses that profit from the illegal occupation Palestine. There’s a big difference, ENS. I’d suggest you re-write this portion of your commentary if you’d like it to be accurate; or print a retraction. Here is a quote from the resolution: ” That the Episcopal Church will work earnestly and with haste to avoid profiting from the illegal occupation of Gaza and the West Bank, and will seek to align itself with, and learn from, the good work of our Ecumenical and Anglican Communion partners, who have worked for decades in support of our Palestinian Christian sisters and brothers and others oppressed by occupation, particularly the Board of Governors of the Church of England and their report of 2006, which states that they will no longer invest in companies that profit from the illegal occupation of Gaza and the West Bank…” July 8, 2015 at 11:14 am Ironically, some will leave, some will return, and some will turn to Christ for the first time because of one or more issue. ‘Twas ever so. There’s no malice… We each do what we must to be at peace with our conscience. Jon Moore Stafford says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab July 7, 2015 at 9:51 pm I wish you Mr. Barker a serene resolution to that conflict. I myself excommunicated the Episcopal Church quite some years ago but now see no hope of any restoration of that. I am going into the Eastern Orthodox Church. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Edmund G. Lowrie, MD says: Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI July 7, 2015 at 2:27 pm We are most conflicted now with the church we love – it seems that the Convention almost desires to re-write the Bible as it pertains to Holy Matrimony. We have many gay and lesbian friends whom we love, cherish and welcome to our faith, however to give the same level of Sacrament to a gay wedding as one between a man and a woman is simply something we cannot accept. We will give prayerful thought to how we proceed, but this is clearly not the same Episcopal Church in which we took our marriage vows 42 years ago. I know the church must evolve to grow and I thought the blessing for gay couples was adequate. I fear this radical change will force us to look for another church home that holds Holy Matrimony they same as we believe and that our church once believed Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN General Convention 2015 Cate Wetherald says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Thomas Coates says: Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH F WILLIAM THEWALT says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA August 23, 2015 at 12:00 am It’s very fortunate timing for the Episcopal church, I suppose, that the general convention was not compelled to consider its historic support for planned parenthood, in light of the egregious processing and for-profit sale of human body parts. I realize the leadership has no difficulty rationalizing it support for this, as it all somehow magically falls under the unassailable umbrella of “womyn’s healthcare”.This is a monstrous, indefensible atrocity, christians. Does this even register on your conscience? Joe barker says: Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events July 7, 2015 at 5:33 pm ENS, you write about the “defeat” of three resolutions calling for the Episcopal Church to advocate boycott, divestment and sanction (BDS) as though it were some landmark even. Lest we forget, the fate of those three resolutions were decided by the church hierarchy, outgoing Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori and the House of Bishops (Episcopal version of the “College of Cardinals”), and, therefore, never reached the House of Deputies (the rank and file lay membership and clergy) for discussion and debate. It was a fait accompli. Consequently, the State of Palestine, including Gaza, East Jerusalem and the West Bank, will continue to suffer and endure Zionist Israel’s 48-year-long (and counting) brutal apartheid, genocidal, ethnic cleansing forced military occupation until 2018, when the Episcopal Church holds its next triennial General Convention. The two commentaries (see links below) explain in detail the dire human consequences of the House of Bishops’ “strong and clear message” that divestment “is not in the best interests of the Episcopal Church”:Episcopal Church rejects BDS resolutions citing fears divestment would hamper church in Jerusalemhttp://mondoweiss.net/2015/07/episcopal-resolutions-divestmentBishops: Divestment Not in our “Best Interests”http://wallwritings.me/2015/07/03/bishops-divestment-not-in-our-best-interests/ Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Wayne Helmly says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA General Convention wrap-up: Historic actions, structural changes First black presiding bishop, marriage equality approved, church governance revamped Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 July 7, 2015 at 3:45 pm All very positive outcomes, love to see my Church moving in the right direction! [Episcopal News Service] The 78th General Convention, in a series of historic moments, elected the first African-American presiding bishop; approved marriage equality for all Episcopalians; adopted a budget that emphasizes racial reconciliation and evangelism; endorsed the study of fossil fuel divestment; opposed divestment in Israel, Palestine; and made some significant changes to the church’s governance.North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry elected presiding bishopThe Episcopal Church’s General Convention made history June 27 when it chose Diocese of North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry to be its 27th presiding bishop.The House of Bishops elected Curry, 62, from a slate of four nominees on the first ballot. He received 121 votes of a total 174 cast. Diocese of Southwest Florida Bishop Dabney Smith received 21, Diocese of Southern Ohio Bishop Thomas Breidenthal, 19, and Diocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, 13. The number of votes needed for election was 89.Curry’s election was confirmed an hour later by the House of Deputies, as outlined in the church’s canons, by a vote of 800 to 12.Full story.Marriage equalityIn the wake of the June 26 U.S. Supreme Court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage for all Americans, General Convention followed suit on July 1 with canonical and liturgical changes to provide marriage equality for Episcopalians.The House of Deputies concurred with the House of Bishops’ approval the day before of a canonical change eliminating language defining marriage as between a man and a woman (Resolution A036) and authorizing two new marriage rites with language allowing them to be used by same-sex or opposite-sex couples (Resolution A054).Full story.Budget emphasizes racial reconciliation, evangelismThe General Convention adopted the 2016-2018 triennial budget July 2 after agreeing to add $2.8 million for evangelism work.While the addition passed with relatively little debate in the House of Deputies, it faced some opposition in the House of Bishops.The 2016-2018 triennial budget is based on $125,083,185 in revenue, compared to the forecasted $118,243,102 for the triennium that ends Dec. 31 of this year. The expenses are projected to be $125,057,351. The budget comes in with a negligible surplus of $25,834. Its revenue projection is based in part on asking the church’s dioceses and regional mission areas to give 18 percent of their income to fund the 2016 budget, 16.5 percent for the 2017 budget and 15 percent in 2018.The version of the budget presented July 1 by the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F) also included a major new $2 million initiative on racial justice and reconciliation, even as it reduces the amount of money it asks dioceses to contribute to 15 percent by 2018.Full story.Mandatory assessmentGeneral Convention made mandatory the current voluntary diocesan budgetary asking system for the 2019-2021 budget cycle and imposed penalties for noncompliance.The mandatory assessment will not apply to the upcoming 2016-2018 triennial budget, but becomes effective Jan. 1, 2019. Without getting a waiver, a diocese that does not pay the full assessment will be unable to get grants or loans from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society unless the Executive Council (http://www.generalconvention.org/ec) specifically approves disbursing the money.(The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business, and carries out mission.)The resolution allows the council to begin granting waivers to dioceses that do not pay, based on financial hardship, beginning Jan. 1, 2016. Council agreed in January to create a so-called Diocesan Assessment Review Committee to work with dioceses that do not to meet the full churchwide asking.The resolution also agrees to study the issue of whether the House of Deputies president ought to receive a salary.Full story.Divest from fossil fuels, reinvest in renewablesGeneral Convention passed two resolutions aimed at environmentally responsible investing and creating a climate change advisory committee.Resolution C045 calls upon the Investment Committee of Executive Council, the Episcopal Church Endowment Fund and the Episcopal Church Foundation “to divest from fossil fuel companies and reinvest in clean renewable energy in a fiscally responsible manner.”Resolution A030 calls for the creation of a climate change advisory committee with one representative from each of The Episcopal Church’s nine provinces. The resolution also calls on each province to create a Regional Consultative Group composed “of no fewer than five experts in areas of environmental sustainability appropriate to the demographic, ecological, cultural and geographic specifics of each region.”Read more here.Agrees to major structural changesThe General Convention approved two resolutions making major changes to the structure of The Episcopal Church.Substitute Resolution A004 slightly expands Executive Council’s appointment power concerning three members of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s executive staff, including the chief operating officer, chief financial officer and chief legal officer (a position created in the resolution).Substitute Resolution A006 reduces the number of the church’s standing commissions from 14 to two. The two would be the Standing Commission on Structure, Governance, Constitution and Canons, and the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music. The presiding bishop and House of Deputies president would appoint study committees and task forces to complete the work called for by a meeting of General Convention, with council’s approval. All of those bodies would expire at the start of the next General Convention unless they are renewed.Full story here. Oppose divestment in Israel, PalestineThe House of Bishops sent a strong and clear message July 2 that divestment from companies and corporations engaged in certain business related to the State of Israel is not in the best interests of The Episcopal Church, its partners in the Holy Land, interreligious relations, and the lives of Palestinians on the ground.The bishops rejected Substitute Resolution D016, which would have called on the Executive Council’s Committee on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) to develop a list of U.S. and foreign corporations that provide goods and services that support the infrastructure of Israel’s occupation “to monitor its investments and apply its CSR policy to any possible future investments” in such companies.General Convention passed two resolutions on peacemaking. Substitute Resolution B013, proposed by Bishop Nicholas Knisely of Rhode Island, “reaffirms the vocation of the Church as an agent of reconciliation and restorative justice,” and recognizes that “meaningful reconciliation can help to engender sustainable, long-lasting peace and that such reconciliation must incorporate both political action and locally driven grassroots efforts.”Resolution C018 expresses solidarity with and support for Christians in Israel and the Israeli-occupied territories; affirms the work of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem in healing, education, and pastoral care; and affirms the work of Christians engaged in relationship building, interfaith dialogue, nonviolence training, and advocacy for the rights of Palestinians. The resolution also urges Episcopalians to demonstrate their solidarity by making pilgrimage to the Holy Land and learning from fellow Christians in the region.Full story.Plans to be created for prayer book, hymnal revisionGeneral Convention 2015 took a step toward revising the 1979 Book of Common Prayer and The Hymnal 1982, directing the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music to prepare plans for revising each and to present them to the next convention in Austin, Texas, in 2018.Among other liturgical issues, the convention directs bishops to find ways for congregations without clergy to receive Communion, but the House of Bishops defeated proposals to allow unbaptized people to receive Holy Communion or to study the issue.The convention approved making available a revised version of “Holy Women,Holy Men” with additional saints’ commemorations but left “Lesser Feasts and Fasts” as the church authorized supplemental calendar of commemorations (see article here).The revised “Holy Women, Holy Men,” is called “A Great Cloud of Witnesses.”Full story.Convention takes a first step, admits: ‘Alcohol affects us all’General Convention passed three resolutions on the issue of alcohol and drug abuse.Resolution D014 recommends that ordinands should be questioned at the very beginning of the discernment process about addiction and substance use in their lives and family systems.The bishops also passed Resolution A159, which acknowledges the church’s role in the culture of alcohol and drug abuse.Resolution A158, to create a task force to review and revise policy on substance abuse, addiction and recovery, passed with one amendment.Full story.Closer relations with CubaThe U.S.-based Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Church of Cuba took a step toward closer relations during the 78th General Convention, meeting here June 25-July 3. Convention also passed a resolution calling for the U.S. government to lift its economic embargo against Cuba.Full story.Presiding Bishop-elect Michael Curry sat for a video interviewIn an 18-minute interview with the Episcopal News Service, Presiding Bishop-elect Michael Curry speaks about his priorities for leadership and administration, the role of the church in engaging God’s mission in the world, the state of race relations in the U.S., the importance of Anglican Communion partnerships, and his commitment to what he calls the Jesus Movement, to go out into the world “to bear witness to the good news of Jesus.”Full video.Bishops led a march against gun violenceAbout 1,500 General Convention participants joined a Bishops United Against Gun Violence procession in Salt Lake City the morning of June 28. The prayerful procession walked the half-mile from the Salt Palace Convention Center to Pioneer Park while marchers sang hymns and prayed. Members of Utah anti-gun violence groups and civil rights organizations joined in.Full video.Greater solidarity for persecuted ChristiansAdvocacy for Christians facing persecution and living in the context of civil war are the subject of several resolutions passed by the Episcopal Church’s 78th General Convention, meeting here June 25-July 3.Convention agrees that Christians in Pakistan, Syria, Liberia, South Sudan and Sudan are among those for whom the church needs to step up its support and solidarity as many of them live in fear of death, starvation, and displacement in their war-ravaged or extremist-influenced countries.Full story. Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel By ENS staff Posted Jul 7, 2015 Rector Albany, NY Jenny Crumley says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Kerith Harding says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

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Farming ministry ‘sows seeds of rebirth’

first_img Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Comments (4) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI August 19, 2016 at 3:41 pm A wonderful article, David. Thank you for the good conversation! Any readers who would like to collaborate with us, ask us questions, or receive help with their own garden projects: ask away, and contact us on Facebook. Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments are closed. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Susan Salem says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI August 21, 2016 at 2:33 am Very interesting. We are exploring the High Tunnel Gardening program under the USDA EQIP. You can be reimbursed for the Kit Structures. Anchorage, Alaska Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Editor’s note: This is the latest in a continuing series about Episcopal Church congregations that are involved in community agriculture. Other stories in the series can be found here.Rows of crops are seen growing earlier this year at the Garden of St. Francis in North Bellmore, New York. Photo: Garden of St. Francis[Episcopal News Service] Ann McPartlin calls them “God incidents” – those pivot points in the life of a church when God’s plan becomes a little less mysterious, when connections are made and a way forward is revealed.By that measure, God is hard at work at St. Francis Episcopal Church in North Bellmore, New York.The history of this suburban Long Island church stretches back only about two years, to the merger of two parishes. That and the sale of one of the two churches were catalysts for change, as was the growth of a successful farming ministry that has breathed new life into the congregation and the working-class community it serves.“It’s been a blessing,” said McPartlin, 71, a senior warden at St. Francis. “We’ve joined together as a parish family, and I just think the love of the ministry is there, people willing to work.”A merger of two struggling Episcopal parishes is hardly new, nor is the sale of old church buildings at a time when dioceses are looking for ways to make ends meet. Farming ministries are common, too – rich in the biblical symbolism of sowing the seeds of rebirth.But as in a puzzle, the pieces of this parish’s rejuvenation have come together in unexpected ways, making it an example for other parishes in the Diocese of Long Island and drawing the attention of the Episcopal Church, which recently backed the Garden at St. Francis through its United Thank Offering grant program, or UTO.The Rev. Mark Genszler applies the theme of rebirth as much to the congregation as to the ground.“It’s the life cycle of the soil and of compost and of food. … I think it’s also very true of this small community here,” said Genszler, who came to the parish two years ago as its first full-time priest. “There was enough of a spark of life here and enough of a prayer life to point those people outward.”A garden ministry is bornBefore St. Francis, there were St. Mark’s and Christ the King. Both churches had struggled to retain members, neither had a full-time priest and Sunday worship attendance in each had dwindled over the years to about 35.Diocese of Long Island Bishop Lawrence Provenzano visited the neighborhood in December 2010, McPartlin said, and he pointed out an additional problem at St. Mark’s: The church wasn’t very visible in the community.“A lot of people thought that the church was closed. There wasn’t a lot of activity going on,” she said.A short time later, a representative from the diocese spoke at St. Mark’s about grants available for new ministries, and McPartlin and a small group of church leaders brainstormed ideas. One of them, Susan Salem, was familiar with the food pantries on Long Island, and she suggested a garden.The idea made sense. What St. Mark’s had in abundance was land, about two acres. Church leaders quickly assembled a grant application and submitted it in February 2011. By that April, they had their seed money and got to work preparing a 50-by-100 garden plot on church grounds.“We had to begin from scratch,” McPartlin said. They didn’t expect much that first year, but the new garden yielded produce to donate to local food pantries. A new was ministry born.The garden wasn’t guaranteed to bring more people to church on Sunday, but McPartlin said they saw themselves as the “little church with a big heart” and were achieving their goals of increased activity and outreach.“Hunger is a really big issue everywhere,” she said. “People think it’s somewhere else, not in your neighborhood, but it’s people living on your street.”The importance of that work came into sharp focus in early November 2012 after Hurricane Sandy devastated much of New York City and Long Island. McPartlin estimates the number of people in need of food suddenly doubled.Two churches become oneHurricane Sandy also happened to force the Diocese of Long Island to cancel a meeting planned that week between the bishop’s staff and St. Mark’s leaders. At the rescheduled meeting a month later, St. Mark’s got the news: The diocese had determined that St. Mark’s and Christ the King were a good fit for a merger.“That’s a very tough experience, to merge churches, because we knew one of them was going to close, and at that point, we didn’t know which one,” she said.With St. Mark’s in need of repairs, McPartlin said it seemed clear the congregation would end up at Christ the King, which had a much newer building. That could have meant the end of their garden ministry.But the garden survived. Under the final plan, the property at Christ the King was sold to a Korean-speaking church, and the proceeds will be used to fix up the buildings at the former St. Mark’s, which had a more prominent location. The garden has become an integral ministry of the combined church, and the choice for a new name was appropriate, Genszler said, given St. Francis’ appreciation for nature.Extensive renovations at the former St. Mark’s will make parts of the church and parish hall unrecognizable in about two years, McPartlin said. With modern advances in building technology, it may even become the “greenest” church in the diocese.Satisfying hunger in many formsA green, energy-efficient building would fit well with the Garden of St. Francis’ expanding ministry. Its application for a UTO grant sought to build a permanent greenhouse and create a coordinator/educator position.The problem of hunger loomed large: hunger for food, for knowledge and for spirituality. Genszler emphasizes another kind of hunger, one that reaches back to Long Island’s agricultural roots before suburban communities began paving them over in the 1940s.“I think there’s a deep hunger for some sort of connection to the non-human-controlled landscape,” he said.Those hungry souls have found a home at the Garden of St. Francis. Volunteers help work the land. School groups come to learn. The church sells some produce at a parish farmers market, and it has donated about 7,000 pounds of produce to food pantries over the years. Its application UTO grant also raised the possibility of establishing an environmental education center.“Not only is the Garden at St. Francis a successful, exciting feeding ministry connected both to community organizations and other parishes, but they eagerly share their knowledge and encourage collaboration,” said Mary Beth Welsh, executive director of Episcopal Ministries of Long Island, which provided some of the early money to get the garden started. “It is exactly the kind of model that we want to support and encourage throughout the diocese.Genszler acknowledges the UTO application may have been overly ambitious. The church didn’t get the $80,000 it requested, but grant officials were impressed with the garden initiative and offered the church $20,000.That’s a big boost for the garden ministry, as well as for a congregation that was struggling just a few years ago before the merger. Church membership is stable now, and for the people of St. Francis, the garden ministry is fertile ground for symbols of new life.“You don’t have to underline it too much,” Genszler said. “The garden kind of preaches the word itself.”— David Paulsen is a freelance writer based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Wauwatosa. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Mark Genszler says: The Rev. Bob Thwing says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Farming ministry ‘sows seeds of rebirth’ Two Long Island churches reborn as one Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Robert Campbell says: August 20, 2016 at 7:04 pm This is a well-written article about St. Francis and its Garden. My wife and I live just down the street from St. Francis and have watched the transformation over the last five years. We are active Episcopalians, but normally attend a church in New York City. The ministry of the garden, being green, feeding the needy, creating a sense of belonging after the merger, and developing a worthy church building have all come together quite neatly in this parish, and worth emulating. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY August 19, 2016 at 6:19 pm Great article, David! Sorry I was not able to get back to you.Updates on our expanding ministry can be found at:https://www.facebook.com/Gardenatstfrancis/Pax,~Susan Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT By David PaulsenPosted Aug 19, 2016 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Church-Community Agriculture Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more