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Adam Deitch Explores Hip Hop Instrumentals In New Solo Album “I Get A Rush” [Premiere/Listen]

first_imgWhen he’s not manning the kit behind groups like Lettuce and Break Science, beloved drummer Adam Deitch is still very much immersed in creating music. After the success of Lettuce’s recently-released Crush, Deitch turned his attention to production, working on neck-breaking hip-hop instrumentals. The result is I Get A Rush, the newest work from Deitch on Gramatik’s Lowtemp label.I Get A Rush is a powerful seven track release, showcasing Deitch’s innate penchant for music production. He’s produced music for hip hop greats like 50-Cent, Redman, Talib Kweli, KRS-One, MF Doom, J-Live, Jurassic 5, Breeze Evahflowin, and Immortal Technique, but we’re even more excited for Deitch to produce his own beats!Fortunately, we’re honored to offer up a full length stream of Deitch’s new I Get A Rush, complete with a track-by-track breakdown detailing the origin of each groove. Check it out!1) Slippin’ Into Science: Years ago I found a version of War’s “Slipping into Darkness” by an unknown funk group from the 70s (while doing my nightly YouTube binges for old rare funk and soul). It had a totally different groove than the OG version and that version became one of Lettuce’s best cover songs. Fast forward a few years, I got to sampling the Lettuce version and reshaped the groove once again to a more J Dilla inspired feel with some live drums I recorded during the Pretty Lights ACMOTS sessions. I had a vocal stem from legend, Chaka Khan, from a session she did with Soulive (thanks Kraz) that fit perfectly in a haunting soulful way, as well as a brief Redman sample that I had from BrkSci’s “Brain Reaction.” I added some analog synthetic bass and and fell in love with this recipe.2) Obey the Crowd: OTC began with some beautifully recorded sounds by acclaimed producer Eliot Lipp who asked me to remix his song. It morphed into its own animal after I added some simple swagged out drums and a mean bass line. Rakim will always be my favorite MC, so his message to “Obey the Crowd” was meaningful to me because my life is based off of making crowds move and serving them fresh music.3) Boom and Pound: This one is a guitar sample with a live drum break of mine and the great Chuck D of Public Enemy, as I just happened to have afew of his a cappellas on my computer. It’s a return to the “Funkier” sound of Hip Hop.4) Interlude: This was made probably in the early 2000s which contains a guitar sample used by so many different producers, but I feel I got a certain DJ Premier type “pocket” on it with the drums so I had to put it out there.5) I Get a Rush: I Get a Rush is about the rush we get from good music. That’s a Method Man vocal sample. The beat was created with my homie Ryan Zoidis, sax player in Lettuce. He brought his analog effects rig into my tight little studio in Brooklyn and laced it up!6) Represent the Gritty: This has a bit of the classical song Claire De Lune, which I sampled an eerie chord from a random dude on YouTube. The drums were live from my AD release, “Break Collection.” Brooklyn is a gritty place with gritty people, struggling to survive, and I will always cherish and represent for my 15 years spent as a Brooklyn resident.7) Joe Mode: This track is a sample flip of “Mode for Joe” by jazz sax legend, Joe Henderson. Joe’s albums are some of the coolest records ever made. The sound feels like a sunny day that has a lot of hope involved. I wanted to basically keep as much of the form of the original song as possible to get the emotions to develop.Adam Deitch is keeping it fresh throughout the fall, as he’s currently on tour with Lettuce. He’ll also be performing several sets at Brooklyn Comes Alive, a multi-venue music festival throughout Brooklyn on October 22nd. Deitch will be playing alongside John Medeski and Skerik for a set of DRKWAV, with members of Lettuce, Break Science, Nth Power, and more as a tribute to J Dilla, AND with Aron Magner, Marc Brownstein and Borahm Lee for the debut of the [Br]eaking [Bi]scuits collaboration. You can find all the info you need, right here.Lettuce’s upcoming tour dates and locations can be seen below.Sounds Like A Party Tour9.28 – Charlotte, NC9.29 – Birmingham, AL9.30 – New Orleans, LA10.1 – New Orleans, LA10.4 – Memphis, TN10.5 – Knoxville, TN10.6 – Columbia, SC10.7 – Corolla, NC10.8 – Wilmington, NC10.11 – Lafayette, IN10.12 – Urbana, IL10.13 – St. Louis, MO10.14 – Kansas City, MO10.15 – Denver, CO10.26 – Baltimore, MD10.27 – Charlottesville, VA10.28 – Asheville, NC10.29 – Live Oak, FL11.2 – San Antonio, TX11.3 – Houston, TX11.4 – Dallas, TX11.5 – Austin, TX11.6 – Tulsa, OK11.9 – Louisville, KY11.11 – New York, NY11.12 – New York, NY11.26 – San Francisco, CA12.1 – Pantanal, Dominican Republic12.30 – Portland, ME12.31 – Boston, MAlast_img read more

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Zebrafish reveal drugs that may improve bone marrow transplant

first_imgUsing large-scale zebrafish drug-screening models, Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital have identified a potent group of chemicals that helps bone marrow transplants engraft or “take.”The findings, featured on the cover of the today’s issue of Nature, could lead to human trials in patients with cancer and blood disorders within a year or two, says senior investigator Leonard Zon, a member of the HSCI executive committee and a professor in Harvard’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology.The compounds, known as epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, or EETs, boosted stem cell engraftment in both zebrafish and mice and could make human bone marrow transplants more efficient. Better engraftment could also allow umbilical cord blood to be used as an alternative to marrow as a source of blood stem cells, greatly increasing a patient’s chances of finding a matched donor and enhancing safety.“Ninety percent of cord blood units can’t be used because they’re too small,” explains Zon, who directs the Stem Cell Program at Boston Children’s. “If you add these chemicals, you might be able to use more units. Being able to get engraftment allows you to pick a smaller cord blood sample that might be a better match.”EETs are fats that appear to work by stimulating cell migration. They were among the top hits in a screen of 500 known compounds conducted in Boston Children’s newly upgraded Karp Aquatics Facility. While zebrafish have previously led Zon’s team to compounds that boost blood stem cell numbers, such as prostaglandin (currently in several clinical trials under the name ProHema), the new drug screen specifically tested the stem cells’ transplantability and engraftment.Red fish, green fishThe screen was done in a lab-created strain of zebrafish called Casper. Because the strain is see-through, Zon and colleagues could visually compare engraftment of transplanted blood stem cells chemically tagged to glow green or red, in what they dubbed the “Dr. Seuss experiment.”Led by co-first authors Pulin Li, Jamie Lahvic, and Vera Binder, the researchers first used tagging to color the fishes’ marrow either red or green, then removed blood stem cells for transplantation. The green cells were incubated with various chemicals, while the red cells were left untreated. Next, the researchers injected a mixture of green and red marrow cells into other groups of zebrafish (10 fish per test chemical). The team then visually tracked the cells’ activity in the transplant recipients and measured the green:red ratio.“We call this a competitive transplant model because we can literally compete a green stem cell against a red stem cell and see what wins,” says Zon. “The expectation was that if [the] chemical didn’t increase engraftment, all the fish would be equal parts red and green. But if it was effective, green marrow would predominate.”That was the case for green marrow incubated with EETs, a finding that held up over thousands of marrow transplants. “In a mouse system, this experiment would cost $3 million,” notes Zon. “In fish, it cost about $150,000.”In a smaller-scale set of mouse experiments, the team confirmed EETs’ efficacy in promoting homing and engraftment of transplanted blood stem cells in mammals.Although EETs are chemical cousins of prostaglandin (both are made from arachidonic acid, and both are made during inflammation), EETs work in a different way, by activating a pathway known as PI3K. EETs also enhanced PI3K activity in human blood vessel cells in a dish.After more studies in human cells to tease out how EETs work, Zon hopes to begin clinical trials of EETs within the next two years, likely in the setting of cord blood transplant. The lab is also investigating its other top hits from the zebrafish screen.“Every new pathway that we find has the chance of making stem cell engraftment and migration even better,” says Zon. “I think we’ll end up being able to manipulate this process.”Supporters of the study include the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, the National Cancer Institute, DFG, and the Care-for-Rare Foundation. Zon is a founder and stockholder of Fate, Inc., and a scientific adviser for Stemgent.last_img read more

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Confessions of a Middle Aged Roadie: Saddle Up With ISM!

first_imgDuring my four years on a road bike, the second most popular question offered to me by non-riders, right after “How do you wear those tights?” is “How can you stand riding for hours on those uncomfortable looking seats.”Both are legitimate questions, though I tend to not give much thought to the first one, choosing instead to respond with “No, I don’t wear tights. I wear the required uniform,” the great quote from Emilio Estevez’s character in The Breakfast Club.Spend a few miles, or a few hours, on a road bike and you will quickly realize that serious attention needs to be paid to the comfort of your bum. The wrong saddle can ruin the shortest ride, while the right one lets the miles easily roll by.The choices, I have learned, are tremendous, with saddles in all shapes and sizes promising comfort and performance. The guys and ladies I ride with often regularly chat up different saddles, and I have found that there are few bike components more often tinkered with or swapped around than where one rests one’s backside.I wanted to find something a bit more comfortable for my bike, so I am spending some time working my way through a series of saddles. I am putting each saddle through the wringer, with each one under me during my regular routine of long rides, short rides, and trainer sessions.  My quest for coziness began with a PL 1.1 by ISM, which I have been riding for the last number of months.The BackstoryISM saddles found their origin back in 1997, when Florida-based cyclist Steve Toll returned home after another trying time in the saddle. Like all cyclists, Toll was in search of more comfort on the bike, and his sketches for what would become an ISM saddle were revolutionary. The design featured a less is more theory, with the nose of the saddle – which often puts the most pressure on a rider’s nether region – missing.The FitBest case scenario for finding a bike saddle is taking your bike to a shop, having a proper fit, and testing out bunches of saddles until you find just the right one. For me, that wasn’t an option. Time in my schedule and a lack of bike shops in my area precluded that. With ISM, I was able to narrow down my choices by considering usage and firmness, along with some help from the folks at the company. While not a perfect or exact science, it worked pretty well, as the PL 1.1 fit me just fine.The HookFor me, the look was the hook. The stock saddle on my Specialized was traditional in form and function. My first look at an ISM saddle blew me away. The cavity in the saddle and the absent front end looked like it had to be more comfortable than anything I had ridden to that point. And it was. I have spent many, many hours on this saddle, both on the road and on the trainer.Miles LaterI have spent a couple thousand miles on my ISM saddle and it is very, very comfortable, particularly when I am out on the road. It is just firm enough for my liking and the design is perfect for relieving pressure exactly where I don’t want there to be pressure. Trainer time is a slightly different story, as I tend to feel more of a rub on the inside of my thighs while I am spinning, but that certainly was no deal breaker when it came to using this saddle. My longest ride of the year, a 52-mile race back in the fall, was a breeze, with no discomfort downstairs, even as I was climbing to the finish line.If you are looking for saddle comfort, whether you are out for an easy cruise or are planning on long rides, I highly suggest you check out these ISM saddles. These guys are proving that flouting convention works. Your backside will thank you.For a look at the full product line from ISM, along with reviews and testimonials, be sure to check out their website.last_img read more

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Board rejects multidisciplinary practices

first_imgBoard rejects multidisciplinary practices New York opposes MDPs, but favors finding ways “to allow lawyers to function alongside other professionals, essentially in an affiliation or side-by-side arrangement that could include sharing expenses but not fees.” The Bar will establish a special commission to study the evolution of the legal practice in light of accelerating social and economic changes. The Rules Regulating The Florida Bar currently protect client interests and should not be amended to allow splitting legal fees with nonlawyers or nonlawyers to own part of a law firm — both seen as necessary for establishing MDPs. Board rejects multidisciplinary practices Associate Editor A resolution declaring multidisciplinary practices go against the core values of the legal profession, including undivided loyalty to the client, has been passed by the Board of Governors. The board, at its June 2 meeting in Naples, also forwarded its MDP findings to the ABA with a recommendation not to change its Model Rules of Professional Conduct to allow MDPs. The board also approved instructions for its representatives in the ABA House of Delegates at July’s ABA Annual Meeting and passed a proposed rule clarifying lawyers’ responsibilities when they engage in ancillary businesses. The action culminates more than two years of Bar study and debate on multidisciplinary practices and ancillary businesses. But Board member Richard Gilbert, co-chair of the Special Committee on MDP/Ancillary Business, warned the votes are only the beginning of the Bar’s involvement with multidisciplinary practices. “In some fashion, some entity needs to be appointed to monitor what is going on, what other states are doing and what other professions are doing,” Gilbert said. “Some ongoing effort needs to be done to keep this issue alive and in our clear focus.” Bar President Edith Osman said the special committee would continue to watch the issue for now, with President-elect Herman Russomanno appointing a successor panel after he is sworn in as president later this month. The approved resolution was reviewed and recommended by the special committee. It was acting on the board’s instruction from its April meeting where governors voted 44-1 that MDPs by their nature violate the core values of the profession, including that a lawyer’s primary loyalty is to the client. The board also found Bar rules prohibiting fee splitting and nonlawyer ownership of a law firm were important to protect the independent professional judgment of lawyers. The resolution made eight points, including that core values encompass undivided loyalty to the client, exercising competent independent judgment for the client, keeping client confidences inviolate and avoiding conflicts of interest with the client. “Multidisciplinary practice is inherently inconsistent with the core values of the legal profession,” the resolution said in point two. Other points include: The Bar will provide guidance to lawyers wishing to engage in ancillary businesses. The Bar will oppose any attempt by the ABA to change its Model Rules of Professional Conduct that would compromise the profession’s core values. That would include allowing fee splitting with nonlawyers or nonlawyer ownership interest in a law firm. The Bar should vigorously enforce its rules. center_img Colorado would allow MDPs, but with provisions guaranteeing lawyers preserve their independent professional judgment. That state, Gilbert said, would have nonlawyer partners in an MDP sign agreements promising not to interfere with lawyers’ professional judgment, and limitations also would be disclosed to clients. Gilbert said he also agreed with a recommendation from the New York bar. “At some point I think it would be appropriate to define what legal services are so that the area of nonlegal services under the ancillary business rule does not expand to compromise what we do, and that is the practice of law,” he said. The profession’s core values are essential to the proper functioning of the court system. Arizona concluded that MDPs already exist and proposed regulations, including that clients be informed of limitations on lawyers practicing in MDPs. June 15, 2000 Gary Blankenship Associate Editor Regular News The board approved the resolution. The ancillary business rule gives lawyers guidance on what is expected when they offer nonlegal services to clients. The rule is based on a similar measure in Pennsylvania and still must go to the Florida Supreme Court for review. It provides if the ancillary services cannot be separated from legal services, then the lawyer is bound by all Bar ethical rules when providing the ancillary services. If it is distinct, lawyers will remain bound by Bar rules unless it is specifically disclosed to clients that the ancillary services are not legal services and do not receive protections afforded by the attorney-client relationship. That motion also was passed. The board actually took three votes pertaining to the ABA, which has had a special commission studying MDPs for more than a year. At last year’s ABA Annual Meeting, the commission recommended changing the Model Rules of Professional Conduct to allow MDPs. But the House of Delegates approved a Florida Bar motion not to allow MDPs until there was a showing they would benefit clients and not compromise the attorney-client privilege and relationship. One board vote forwarded its MDP recommendation to the House of Delegates. The second instructed its House delegates to oppose the ABA commission’s recommendation to postpone debate on the issue from the July Annual Meeting until the February Midyear Meeting. The third authorized the Bar’s delegates to work on a common position with delegates from several other states — notably New York, Illinois, New Jersey, Ohio and California — in opposing MDPs in the House of Delegates. Board member John Hume initially objected to the third proposal because the special committee used the word “compromise” in its recommendation and he said it was wrong for the Bar to even hint it would compromise after taking a strong anti-MDP position. The wording of the motion was changed to authorize delegates to work with other states that opposed MDPs on a joint position, which President-elect Designate Terry Russell said would improve the chances of defeating MDPs. Besides those actions, Gilbert updated the board on national developments on MDPs. Those include that the ABA commission has changed its recommendation to allowing only MDPs that are controlled by lawyers, with ethical concerns deferred to the ABA’s ethics committee and regulatory issues deferred to the states. Noting the Board of Governors’ position opposes that and the commission was asked to come up with empirical evidence MDPs would not damage clients, Gilbert said, “They don’t believe they can get empirical evidence. They want to change the system and then see what happens when the change is implemented.” Three other state bars have also taken positions, he said, including: last_img read more

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LIE High-speed Chase Ends in Crash, DWI Arrest

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York David Thompson (SCPD)An alleged drunk driver traveling at 100 mph took Suffolk County police on a high-speed chase early Thursday morning, which ended when the man slammed into a tractor-trailer in Nassau County, police said.David Thompson, 32, of Far Rockaway, was arrested and charged with driving while intoxicated, unlawful fleeing a police officer in a motor vehicle, reckless driving and speeding.The high-speed pursuit began just before midnight Thursday when highway patrol officers at Route 111 on the Long Island Expressway saw Thompson’s vehicle traveling at speeds of 100 mph or more, police said. Officers followed and attempted a traffic stop but Thompson refused, police said, and continued driving west on the expressway into Nassau.Nassau County police joined in on the pursuit and also attempted a traffic stop, but Thompson never stopped, police said.He eventually approached the construction zone at Exit 43, which is closed. Thompson decided to take the service road but spotted traffic and tried to re-enter the LIE before crashing into the tractor-trailer and a Suffolk patrol car, police said.Thompson, who suffered a minor injury to his hand, was the only one injured in the crash.last_img read more

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Nonprofit Conference Gives Charities Tips to Navigate Rough Patches

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Hundreds of attendees in the nonprofit sector will be on hand to hear from experts and network during the ninth annual Investors Bank Not-For-Profit Conference on Long Island next month.Titled “How To Manage In Turbulent Times,” the event will feature Keynote Speaker Ed Henry, President And CEO of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, who will discuss competitive pressures and a global economy.“Providing resources for nonprofit organizations is a large part of who we are as a bank,” says Jennifer Smith, the Community Development Officer at Investors Bank. “The conference is an opportunity for us to reach out to community organizations within the bank’s footprint in New York and New Jersey and help with networking opportunities and access to experts in fundraising, development and nonprofit tax law.”The goal for this year’s Investors’ Bank Conference is to motivate and inspire not-for profit professionals as they work together to help their clients amid the continuing trend of increased demand and decreased donations that makes their work so difficult and critical.“The conferences have both grown in size and the programs have evolved as well,” Smith says. “Raising funds just gets harder every year. Social media has also dramatically changed how nonprofits reach out to potential volunteers and donors. We’ve tried to incorporate these changes into our programming.”The speakers will provide guidance and case studies on how nonprofits can think strategically about what is central to achieving their vision.“We want to thank the Long Island Press and Queens Courier, as well as the Queens Chamber of Commerce, for your help with planning this free resource for nonprofits in Long Island and Queens.”The Investors Bank Not-for-profit Conference will be held 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Apr. 11 at The Inn at New Hyde Park, which is located at 214 Jericho Tpke. In New Hyde Park. The event is free of charge but registration is required. To register, visit: myinvestorsbank.com/nynfp or contact Jennifer L. Smith at 718-330-3830 or [email protected] investorsbank.comFrom left to right: David Rottkamp, Terrie Magro, Eric Alexander and Rhonda Klch.SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:8:30 am – 9:30 am: Registration and breakfast9:30 am – 9:45 am: Opening remarks from Investors Bank9:45 am – 10:15 am: Keynote presentation from Ed Henry10:15 am – 10:30 am: Q&A10:30 am – 10:45 am: Break10:45 am – 11:30 am: Panel Discussion with Rhoda Klch of First Equity, Terrie Margoof The Magro Foundation and Eric Alexandar of Vision Long Island11:30 am – 12:00 pm: Expert Session: Tax Reform with David Rottkamp of Grassi & Co.12:00 pm – 12:30 pm: Closing Remarks and RaffleMore speakers to be announcedlast_img read more

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How a new brand transformed a retail branch

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Branding touches everything. Your people and your products. Your boardroom and your break room. Your mission and your marketing. And especially your branches.Inspire Federal Credit Union offers an excellent example of a credit union where branding touched everything—and eventually its branches. Inspire recently completed a state of the art branch renovation (see pictures below) and is the first credit union in its area to offer this type of facility.The new branch features two 60-inch, high definition television screens, brand new “teller pods” that allow for tellers to connect more easily with members and a technology center that allows Inspire FCU’s financial experts to sit down with members and show them the credit union’s technology. Of course, the new branch also offers a renovated coffee station (members love free coffee!) that even features a special charging area for mobile devices.“We wanted to design the branch to meet the vision of how we want to serve our members going into the future,” said Inspire FCU’s CEO Jim Merrill. continue reading »last_img read more

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Deputies arrest suspect for taking $155,000 from place of employment

first_imgThe sheriff’s office says 43-year-old Amy L. Grant of New Berlin was charged with grand larceny in the 2nd degree, scheme to defraud in the 1st degree, and falsifying business records in the 1st degree. All are felonies. They say Grant stole over $155,000 from her place of employment. The name of the business she worked for was not released. Grant is scheduled to appear in court at a later date. The time of the scheduling was not released.center_img TOWN OF COLUMBUS (WBNG) — The Chenango County Sheriff’s Office says one person has been arrested into an embezzlement investigation in the town of Columbus.last_img read more

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Offices: On the churn

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First passengers exit quarantined Japan ship

first_imgThe first passengers began leaving a quarantined cruise ship off Japan’s coast on Friday to finish their isolation in government-designated lodging after testing negative for the new coronavirus.Japan’s government has given passengers aged 80 or older in poor health or confined to windowless inner cabins on the Diamond Princess the chance to move from the ship to accommodation on land.But only those who test negative for the virus that has so far infected more than 200 people on board the ship have the option to move. The first of them departed the massive cruise ship on Friday afternoon, travelling in buses with blacked out windows.At the wheel, one driver was dressed in a head-to-toe white protective suit, complete with goggles and mask.A government official said 11 people had left, but declined to say whether more would depart Friday or offer further details.The move comes a day after the number of infections diagnosed on the ship rose to 218. Topics :center_img Senior health ministry official Gaku Hashimoto boarded the ship Friday morning to announce that all passengers “who are considered to be high risk in general health” would now be tested for the virus.”Those who test positive will be transferred to the hospital. Those who test negative will — at the request of the individual — disembark and be transferred to accommodation provided by the government,” he said in a statement in English read out by the ship’s captain in a public broadcast.”We are aware that many people are worried and concerned about the situation. However, to improve the situation as much as possible, the government is making its best efforts,” the statement said.There were more than 3,700 people on the ship when it arrived off the Japanese coast last week, but those diagnosed with the virus have been taken off the boat, along with some people suffering other health conditions requiring medical attention.Ten of those hospitalized are now in serious condition, Health Minister Katsunobu Kato said on Friday.Excluding the cases on the ship, and an infected quarantine officer, Japanese authorities have so far diagnosed 33 people with the newly named COVID-19.The newly diagnosed cases include a woman in her 80s whose positive test result emerged after she died in hospital.The woman was reportedly the mother-in-law of a taxi driver in Tokyo who has also been diagnosed with the virus.A doctor in Wakayama prefecture and a patient treated in the hospital where the doctor worked have also been diagnosed.Officials in the region said they were still not sure if the doctor had infected the patient.”It is difficult to trace the route of the infection”, governor Yoshinobu Nisaka told reporters.He said officials were asking people in the area “to report suspicious cases of pneumonia so that we can immediately conduct tests”.The hospital has been closed to visitors and medical staff are now being tested for the virus, Nisaka added.Despite the new infections, government officials sought to play down concerns about the spread of the virus in Japan.”There is not enough epidemiological evidence to suggest that the epidemic is spreading inside Japan,” government spokesman Yoshihide Suga told reporters.”We will keep collecting epidemiological information including on the routes of infection.”The Diamond Princess has been quarantined off Japan since early February after it emerged a former passenger who got off the boat in Hong Kong had tested positive for the virus.The quarantine is due to end on Feb. 19 and those on the ship have been mostly confined to their cabins and asked to wear masks and keep their distance from other passengers during brief outings on open deck.Crew on board have expressed concern that their conditions — including shared cabins, bathrooms and workspaces — put them at greater risk of contracting the virus.On Friday afternoon, the crew distributed iPhones to passengers on board, with the captain saying the handsets had been sent by the Japanese government.”We are distributing iPhones to all staterooms, loaded with an application… [that] will help you to get medical support. Full instructions will be distributed together with the phones,” he said.last_img read more