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Jackie Greene Covers Dead and Beatles On A Chilly Night At The Mish [Photos/Video]

first_imgLoad remaining images Jackie Greene came to The Mishawaka Amphitheatre Friday night, on what was a rather chilly evening up at the Bellvue, CO venue. With local musicians Matt Mahern and Brent Cowles (formerly of You, Me and Apollo) in tow, it was a singer-songwriter kind of night, with well-crafted songs and plenty of Americana rock to warm the crowd up.Both support acts played solid sets, with Cowles performing a rocking cover of Whitney Houston‘s “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” that got everybody warmed up for the night in store.Greene, guitarist Nathan Dale, bassist Jon Cornell, and drummer Fitz Harris were on point, as usual, with a set that consisted of mostly originals, including “Silver Lining” and the “The King Is Dead” from his latest effort Back to Birth. “So Hard to Find My Way” from 2008’s American Myth and the gorgeous gospel song “Hallelujah” witnessed Greene sit down at the keys for a brief portion of the night’s performance, before strapping the guitar back on.With his relationship to Phil Lesh and the Grateful Dead extended family, performing as one of the bassist’s “Friends” time and time again over the years, it was no coincidence that the NorCal rocker went into a rousing “Shakedown Street” that got all the cold bones in attendance warmed up. An always welcomed “Jack Straw” led into The Beatles‘ “Don’t Let Me Down” that witnessed all the Deadheads and Beatlemaniacs in the crowd singing along.While it was a pretty brisk night up, Jackie Greene and company kept things warm enough to enjoy another evening in Colorado mountains up at The Mish, which will be closing the outdoor portion of the venue after next weekend’s performances.Check out some videos from the evening. All photos courtesy of Sunny Side Production.last_img read more

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Dark Star Orchestra Announces New Year’s Run & Fall Tour

first_imgDark Star Orchestra has been a fan-favorite Grateful Dead-inspired act for decades. The group is a well-known road dog, extensively and regularly touring the country and bringing their exacting recreations of specific Grateful Dead shows to the masses. Today, the band has announced their plans to end 2018 with a four-date Cosmic New Year’s tour, ringing in 2019 at the Wellmont Theater in Montclair, New Jersey, on December 30th and 31st. These newly announced dates pair with the band’s announcement of a 16-date second leg of their fall tour.Focusing heavily on the East Coast, for their fall tour, Dark Star Orchestra will wind through New England’s familiar towns, including multiple-night stands in at Huntington, NY’s The Paramount; Richmond, VA’s The National; and Philadelphia, PA’s Electric Factory; as well as their return to Washington, D.C.’s The Anthem.Additionally, Dark Star Orchestra has plans into 2019, highlighted by their seventh-annual Jamaican Jam in the Sand festival, happening January 15th through 19th in Runaway Bay, Jamaica. Featuring a beachside stage and located at an all-inclusive resort, the destination festival features four nights of Dark Star Orchestra, plus two sets of The Wailers, and three sets from Green Leaf Rustlers. Limited packages remain with complete information available here.Check out the video below, of Dark Star Orchestra’s debut performance at Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Morrison, Colorado, earlier this summer, where they took on recreating the Grateful Dead setlist from July 8th, 1978, 40 years to the day at the same stage the original set occurred.For more information about ticketing or the group, head to their website here.Dark Star Orchestra Fall 2018 Tour + Cosmic New Year’s Run: 9/27 – First Avenue – Minneapolis, MN9/28 – Riverside Theatre – Milwaukee, WI9/29 – The Vic Theatre – Chicago, IL10/1 – Monarch Music Hall – Peoria, IL10/3 – Mercury Ballroom – Louisville, KY10/4 – The Pageant – St. Louis, MO10/5 – Egyptian Room – Indianapolis, IN10/6 – Majestic Theatre – Detroit, MI10/8 – The Intersection – Grand Rapids, MI10/10 – The Clyde – Fort Wayne, IN10/11 – House Of Blues – Cleveland, OH10/12 – Stage AE – Pittsburgh, PA10/13 – Express Live – Columbus, OH11/9 – Lowell, MA – Lowell Memorial Auditorium11/10 – Ithaca, NY – State Theatre of Ithaca11/11 – Northampton, MA – Calvin Theatre11/13 – S. Burlington, VT – Higher Ground11/15 – Portland, ME – State Theatre, Portland, Maine11/16 – New Haven, CT – College Street Music Hall11/17 – Albany, NY – Palace Theatre11/18 – Peekskill, NY – Paramount Hudson Valley11/20 – Concord, NH – Capitol Center for the Arts11/21 – Jim Thorpe, PA – Penn’s Peak11/23 – Huntington, NY – The Paramount11/24 – Huntington, NY – The Paramount11/28 – Richmond, VA – The National11/29 – Richmond, VA – The National11/30 – Norfolk, VA – The NorVA12/1 – Washington, D.C. – The Anthem12/28 – Philadelphia, PA – Electric Factory12/29 – Philadelphia, PA – Electric Factory12/30 – Montclair, NJ – The Wellmont Theater12/31 – Montclair, NJ – The Wellmont TheaterView All Tour Dateslast_img read more

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The Power of ScaleIO – Forrester Total Economy Impact Study

first_imgSave $88.2M in costs – Check. 140,000 hours of developer productivity saved – Check. 20 million+ IOPS – Check. 5X improvement in deployment time – Check. Data migration – Every 25 Years…Check!Dell EMC commissioned Forrester to interview a large, global financial institution – a long standing Dell EMC ScaleIO customer – to create a Forrester Total Economic Impact report. Forrester TEI reports are well regarded throughout the industry as objective, impartial studies of products’ and technologies’ economic impact on a business. The results were simply outstanding. Forrester estimates that the customer enjoyed $186.7 million in total benefits, a savings of $88.2 million after deploying ScaleIO over a period of four years with an outstanding ROI of 89% and a payback period of only 10 months. This includes categories such as CapEx savings from storage hardware and software, savings from power cooling and facilities, OpEx savings from management and support and substantial savings from avoiding disruptions from migrations by the application team. The customer expanded their ScaleIO deployment from a single datacenter to 8 data centers in a short period of 18 months and estimates that 72 PBs of storage will be managed by ScaleIO within the next four years.Before ScaleIOPrior to using ScaleIO, the interviewed customer embarked on a strategy initiative to transform into a digital organization, shifting over $1 billion from the IT infrastructure budget to application development areas to fuel client innovation. At the same time, the financial crisis forced the bank to invest more heavily in IT to increase collaboration and reduce costs. These drivers led to increased growth in storage and infrastructure requirements to support these projects. At a 30% annual growth rate of the organization’s SAN storage environment, the pace of growth was offsetting the benefits from traditional storage as the cost of managing storage in silos got bigger each year. The organization realized that it needed a cost-efficient storage solution that could scale with the enterprise.After ScaleIOToday the customer has thousands of developers on the ScaleIO platform managing thousands of applications and their number keeps on expanding rapidly.  For example the customer expects to have 40% of databases running on ScaleIO by 2019. The typical storage pod has anywhere between 90 to 110 servers in a single ScaleIO cluster which, though a big number, is only a fraction of the total number of servers that CAN be managed in a single ScaleIO cluster. ScaleIO’s outstanding performance has won many fans in the customer’s organization as each all-flash configured pod can easily provide 20 million IOPS. Capex SavingsThe customer’s total CAPEX savings of $111 million is generated by large savings from mainly three categories.From massively consolidating multiple silos of underutilized storage. With ScaleIO’s excellent performance, scalability, flexibility and reliability, the customer is able to pool storage resources much more efficiently and significantly consolidate multiple islands of traditional storage down to an optimal footprint.All features are included in the ScaleIO pricing. There is no separately charged feature license.Avoiding Fiber Channel. By not having to deploy Fiber Channel SAN hardware and software which include Fiber Channel switches, directors, software licenses, cables, racks and HBAs.In order to reap these savings over four years, the customer invested $71.7 million in ScaleIO software and hardware.Opex SavingsThis organization reported that “from a labor support perspective, the operating costs of ScaleIO are one-tenth the operating costs of traditional storage.” Part of this cost reduction was due to the elimination of “big lift and shift” storage array upgrades.Management and support cost savings came from easier deployment activities such as bidding, capacity planning, and faster provisioning of storage. For example, they were able to stand up a pod in 31 days with ScaleIO when compared to six months in a traditional block storage environment. This translates to a 5X improvement or 83% reduction in deployment time. Further, they were able to eliminate forklift upgrades and data migration costs resulting in 140,000 hours saved from approximately 3,500 developers saving 40 hours on an average. Lastly, the IT infrastructure team was also able to reduce management effort with virtualization and consolidation. In total, the customer saves an estimated $55.7 million over four years.In order to reap these savings the customer invested $19.6 million in operating expenses for ScaleIO. These included Implementation costs, Labor costs and Ongoing Management costs.Data Center CostsFinally, the organization provided estimates from 30% to 98% reduction in power, cooling and facilities costs across the organization. One interviewee noted that with the efficiency brought by its ScaleIO investment, the organization now had more space in the data center to run other hardware. This is a valuable benefit as the cost of building a new data center when an organization runs out of space can run into millions of dollars.In aggregate the customer is estimated to save about $20 million over four years. The data center costs for ScaleIO over the same period of time are expected to be about $7 million.In SummaryScaleIO is a transformational technology. As validated in the TEI report, a customer can completely redefine their IT processes – add agility, accelerate deployment, completely eliminate migrations altogether and reduce costs significantly through massive consolidation by adopting ScaleIO. As we move towards a new era in IT where software defined infrastructure is the NEW norm, ScaleIO is the perfect enterprise grade software defined storage for ALL enterprise applications.ResourcesFull Study: The Total Economic Impact Of Dell EMC ScaleIOInfographics: 1 Pagerlast_img read more

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Digital Week Keynote explores academia online

first_imgThe Office of Digital Learning continued its ND Digital Week events with a discussion of digital scholarship and its potential impact on the humanities lead by University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts associate professor Tara McPherson Monday in Carey Auditorium.“I want to talk to you as a humanities scholar on how we can imagine scholarship anew given the networked ecology that much of our data and scholarly archives now inhabit,” McPherson said. “I teach in a school of cinematic arts. These archives which are being built without any mind or preservation or any sustainability for the future could be the textual or visual evidence for countless dissertations in my field for decades to come.”McPherson said humanities scholars’ ability to include meaning, emotions and consciousness in archived data is invaluable. She said the USC’s Shoah Foundation dedicated to providing audio and visual testimonies regarding the Holocaust.“Humanities scholars are building really rich datasets of our own,” McPherson said. “There are over 54,000 testimonies in this rich archive — hundreds of thousands of hours of footage. … We’re not going to figure out what this means as evidence or as archival testimony without the work of humanities scholars. They’ll be really important to help us think through the emotional aspect, the embodiment, trauma, memory, on how … they carry the gesture of a survivor’s body as they recount a memory.”McPherson said the newfound range and depth of data ready to be published and accessed by an unprecedented number of people mandates changes made to the practices, the publication and medium of the academia in humanities.“Then there are a variety of ways new scholarly practices have emerged as we think about what the digital age affords us,” McPherson said. “There is a project undertaken by Kathy Rowe at Bryn Mawr … that opened a particular issue up about open peer review as opposed to closed, blind peer review practices we tend to fetishize as scholars and they found an interesting set of practices in open peer review that were no less rigorous than blind peer review.“Another increasingly important thing for scholars to think through now is who we let publish our work so that a public library of science that makes scholarship free and public to all and not behind paywalls and not behind subscription magazines,” McPherson said.McPherson said she experiments with new mediums of academia like the USC-hosted online journal Vectors, which features interactive Adobe Flash projects. Scalar, another academic online platform automatically links publications’ citations to other relevant scholarly pieces and multimedia, McPherson said.Although these emerging platforms employ kinesthetic components to convey information in more meaningful ways, they face the issue of credibility, McPherson said.“I really love Vectors and continue to work in it but there are lots problems as well, particularly from a librarian’s point of view,” McPherson said.McPherson said that the accessibility of digital scholarships is a double-edged sword.“Just click ‘Go Live’ and put a link on your website,” McPherson said. “But very few tenured university committees are going to take that seriously because we advocated a responsibility to reevaluate work [in traditional mediums].”Even so, McPherson said digital scholarship increases the mediums of ingenuity and ingeniousness.“Anybody could do some work in Scalar and it could be brilliant,” McPherson said.Tags: digital scholarship, Digital Week 2014, Office of Digital Learning, Tara McPhersonlast_img read more

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A Gentleman’s Guide Star Bryce Pinkham is Broadway.com’s Next Vlogger

first_img Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 17, 2016 Can a camera be used as a weapon? We sure hope not. Tony nominee Bryce Pinkham has returned to A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, and this time, he vlogging all about it. Brace yourselves for Full Monty: Backstage at A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder with Bryce Pinkham.The devilish leading man will give us a peak of life at the Walter Kerr Theatre, where it’s kill or be killed. Well, at least on stage. Expect kooky appearances from fellow co-stars Jefferson Mays (all eight versions of him), Scarlett Strallen, Catherine Walker and more.Pinkham received a Tony nod for originating the role of Monty in A Gentleman’s Guide. He recently took a hiatus to appear in the revival of The Heidi Chronicles; his additional Great White Way credits include Ghost and Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson.Written by Robert L. Freedman and Steven Lutvak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder follows Monty Navarro, a long-lost member of a noble family who stands to become the next Earl of Highhurst—if he can eliminate the eight other relatives (all played by Mays) who precede him in line for the title.Full Monty will kick off on August 10 and air every Monday for eight weeks. Star Files A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder Bryce Pinkham View Commentslast_img read more

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Renewables generated nearly 45% of Great Britain’s electricity in the first quarter

first_imgRenewables generated nearly 45% of Great Britain’s electricity in the first quarter FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:The first three months of 2020 were a landmark quarter for Great Britain, with renewable providing more power than from any other major power source, providing 45% of all electricity generation, and beating out total fossil fuel generation, including coal and gas.The milestone moment was highlighted in European power analysts EnAppSys’ latest quarterly energy market report, covering the first three months of 2020.In total, across the first quarter, renewable energy generated 35.4TWh, accounting for 44.6% of all power generation across Great Britain, followed by 29.1% from gas-fired power plants, 15.3% from nuclear power, 7.3% from imports, and only 3.7% from coal.This means that not only did renewables generated more electricity than any other power source, but also means in turn that renewables beat out all fossil fuels combined (gas plus coal).There were a number of factors which helped lead to this milestone moment, with extreme weather conditions across the first three months of the year in Great Britain resulting in consistently high levels of wind generation. Similarly, as with many countries around the world, the spreading coronavirus pandemic led to declining electricity demand in March.Despite the contributing factors, this is nevertheless an important milestone for Great Britain’s electricity sector, as its renewable electricity generation was already on track to overtake fossil fuels this year based on historical trends.[Joshua Hill]More: Renewables were Britain’s main power source in first quarterlast_img read more

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Back to the basics

first_imgAs I sit and type this on my front porch, the beauty of the day today almost makes me giggle.Spring has hit in full swing, and this promises to be a gorgeous week in the mountains.  As I organize myself for a busy and exciting summer of traveling, competing, writing, and managing my business, I am more thankful than ever for the ability to get into my kayak, clear my mind, and work on the basics.It is an extremely cathartic way of re-centering.The forward stroke in a kayak is so simple… place blade in water, pull, and transfer energy to boat.  It is amazing how something so fundamental can keep us occupied for a lifetime of learning.  It doesn’t matter if you get on the river two weekends a year or if you are training for the Olympics in London this summer, that most basic of strokes can always be finessed or tweaked in some way.Similar to the subject of the Monogamy article in last month’s issue of Blue Ridge Outdoors, my local class II training rapids have seen me through a lot of different phases in my life.  My connection with it first began when I moved to this town, the place that I now hope to spend the rest of my life in.  Since then, those waters have helped me through the tribulations of getting an undergrad degree, dealing with failed relationships, losing loved ones, and struggling to make ends meet financially.  While helping me through the lows, that training ground has also been an enabler in the quest to be the athlete and individual that I want to be.  It represents thousands of hours of sweat, and constant dissection of every minute detail of paddling technique.  It feels good to reap the rewards of that effort when the stars align, and I have a strong showing in competition.I was speaking with a fellow paddler about this subject recently, and the conversation made me think about my sport a little bit differently.  When it comes down to it, a kayaker with a paddle is a nearly perfect union for power transfer from body to water.  The powerful core muscles of the human body allow incredible torque and power to be applied to that blade, and that makes it possible for paddlers to maneuver lithely around slalom gates or other obstacles, accelerate instantly to a sprint for short periods of time, or slow their stroke down to a sustainable metronome for 250+ mile paddles in 24 hours.Couple that with the ability to roll upright when capsized, and a low enough center of gravity to navigate seemingly impossible rapids, and you start to see why so many people are pulled in by the allure of running rivers in a kayak.But everything still hinges on that forward stroke.  The funny thing is that every kayaker still has their own individual style.  I could recognize many of my friends in completely foreign gear if I had to, simply due to the fact that I have seen how they move and deal with different obstacles that the river throws at them.Paddling a kayak is a constant refinement and self-discovery process, and taking things back to the basics is a humble acknowledgement that we still have much to learn.  The expression, “it’s about the journey, not the destination” could not ring more true here.Whatever your passion is, get outside this week and take it back to the fundamentals.  There’s always something new to learn.last_img read more

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Countering lawyers’ bad rap: All Bar Conference focuses on Dignity in Law

first_img February 1, 2003 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News Countering lawyers’ bad rap: All Bar Conference focuses on Dignity in Law Associate EditorRemember this scene from the 1997 movie “The Rainmaker”?Danny DeVito plays the feisty paralegal, Matt Damon plays the fresh young lawyer, and they are about to cruise the hospital looking for prospective clients, the more battered and injured, the better.When Damon’s young lawyer character looks alarmed, DeVito says: “What did they teach you in law school?”“Well, they didn’t teach me to chase ambulances.”“Well, you’d better learn quick — or you’ll starve.”DeVito seizes the opportunity of an accident victim strung up in traction. By the end of their quick, unannounced visit, DeVito gets the patient’s signature by moving a contract under the hand of the poor guy who can barely clench a pen with his broken arm stuck in a cast. The deal is sealed when DeVito sticks his business card in the patient’s mouth.“We came with nothing,” DeVito tells Damon on the way out of the hospital. “If he had thrown us out of the room, what would we have lost?”While that exaggerated scene can’t help but bring a few chuckles, what the legal profession loses with such Hollywood depictions of lawyers is some more of its precious dignity.What was gained from showing that film clip was sparking a lively discussion at the All Bar Conference January 16 in Miami about Dignity in Law, the first segment of the day-long session that included a panel discussion with members of the news media and tips from Christine Barney, CEO of rbb Public Relations, on how lawyers should deal with the media to get their message out.The benefit of the day’s events, said Alan Bookman, chair of the All Bar Conference, was exposure to the Dignity in Law program to members of voluntary bars, section leaders and chairs who need to get out and spread the word to their membership.“We have to remember that we are all lawyers, whether you practice tax law, whether you practice probate, trust and guardianship, we are all lawyers,” Bookman said. “We are, unfortunately, by a large segment of the public, put into the same barrel. We need to change that perception, because this is an honorable profession. And for some reason, the public doesn’t think so anymore. And we just need to change that, because we are often guided by what our clients want us to do. And unfortunately, some of our clients want us to be bulldogs, and want us to be obnoxious. The most obnoxious person wins. That’s not the way to practice law. You can get the same success and zealously represent your client and be professional.”But it’s the bulldogs that grab the headlines and inspire the starring roles in films.Second Judicial Circuit Judge Terry Lewis and Blan Teagle, director of The Florida Bar Center for Professionalism, used “The Rainmaker” film clip and others — including the comedy “My Cousin Vinny” and the classic Jimmy Stewart drama “Anatomy of a Murder” to illustrate how the powerful medium of films molds public perception about the legal profession. The idea of the interactive seminar, called “The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly: Lawyers and Popular Film,” was to challenge participants to determine what is professional behavior for lawyers, after viewing how the public sees them in the movies.Judge Lewis told the group he was influenced by the movies as a kid, and when he watched Perry Mason, he thought, “That guy is cool. I’d like to do that.. . . But then I realized all my clients wouldn’t be innocent, so I stayed away from criminal law.”When the DeVito character expresses a lawyer’s ethics, he sums it up as “Fight for your client, refrain from stealing, and try not to lie.”Judge Lewis asked seminar participants to list their own litmus test for ethics. Up on the poster board came this list: “What would Mom think? The Golden Rule. Would I open myself up for criticism, especially from the Bar? Would I mind if the news media reported it? Would it pass my ‘gut test’? Would my client approve? How does it mesh with what I’ve been taught by my faith? Would it withstand the ethical standards of my profession and community?”“I’m partial to the Golden Rule myself,” Judge Lewis said. “Obviously, Danny DeVito had his own moral compass.”Teagle admitted he was a bit naive when he graduated from law school and first went to work as a lawyer.“I didn’t realize it was a business. I knew it intellectually, but I didn’t understand it,” he said. Eventually, he said he understood that “yes, it is a business and a profession. It’s not either/or, but it must be kept in balance.”Board of Governors member David Bianchi of Miami made the point that only 20 percent of the public go to lawyers for litigation-related matters.“It’s what we just saw in the movie that is really how the entire profession is judged, even though it represents a small section of why people go to lawyers.. . The image of lawyers is being judged by a single digit (of lawyers who do unethical things). What are the few doing that hurts the many?” Don Horn, another board member from Miami, added: “Movies help mold and shape our image with the public. More people will see this movie than anything we produce in Dignity in Law. We can mold and shape by saying, ‘No, there are a whole lot of lawyers doing good things.’” Bar President Tod Aronovitz interjected that he is getting a lot of positive feedback about the Bar’s Dignity in Law program that is trying to spread the word about the good things that lawyers and judges do every day.“I also spent a lot of time with journalists and nonlawyers,” Aronovitz said. “And I am of the strong belief that mentoring is very, very important for this whole issue of professionalism. As recently as yesterday, I was talking to a respected journalist about why she isn’t covering this All Bar Conference. And she was talking to me about the courtesy and condescending conduct. And the reason she believes most lawyers are not received well or not perceived to be honest and reputable, is not because they are not honest, but because of the way they act toward other people.”Yet, when people get in trouble, they want an aggressive advocate, Judge Lewis said.“It’s very similar to your representatives in Congress,” Judge Lewis said. “They think Congress is the scum of the Earth, except for their own members, who get re-elected. They don’t like lawyers. They’re awful. But not mine. They want an aggressor, they want a son of a bitch for themselves.”Christopher Neilson, of the Broward County Bar Association, said advertising doesn’t help lawyers’ image. He said his wife, who is a nurse, was offended by an ad that said: “Call 1-800-PIT-BULL.”“The media portrays us as a Danny DeVito,” Neilson said. “We have to try to turn it around by developing a positive image that overcomes that. How we do that is one day at a time, one step at a time.” Countering lawyers’ bad rap: All Bar Conference focuses on Dignity in Lawlast_img read more

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Cybersecurity investment pays dividends three times over

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Plenty of standards documentation exist, including ISO and NIST. The NIST Model, which NCUA refers to in its Cybersecurity Resources, breaks it down into these five components: Building a sustainable cybersecurity program is crucial for credit unions, as 61% of cyberattacks are aimed at small- to mid-sized businesses, particularly financial institutions, according to the 2017 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report. Lack of a strong cybersecurity program can be disastrous financially and in terms of reputation risk.Companies looking to create cyberdefense programs must focus on 6 key areas:       Governance and Risk Management        Implementation and Design       User Authentication and Authorization       Prevention and Defense       Data Protection and Encryption       Monitoring and Responsecenter_img continue reading »last_img read more

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NAFCU meets with NCUA Chair Hood

first_img continue reading » NCUA Board Chairman Rodney Hood met with NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger at the association’s headquarters Wednesday to discuss priorities for the agency.“NAFCU thanks Chairman Hood for his leadership, and for taking the time to discuss regulatory burdens facing the industry and how our member credit unions would like to see them addressed,” Berger said. “We look forward to working with Chairman Hood, and NCUA Board Members [J. Mark] McWatters and [Todd] Harper, to ensure credit unions have a regulatory environment that allows them to grow and thrive.”Berger was joined by NAFCU Executive Vice President of Government Affairs and General Counsel Carrie Hunt and Director of Regulatory Affairs Ann Kossachev. From NCUA with Chairman Hood were Sarah Vega and Owen Cole. The group also recently met with Board member Harper. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more