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LCD Soundsystem Performs Their First Show In Five Years [Watch]

first_imgSetlist: LCD Soundsystem at Webster Hall, New York, NY  – 3/27/16Set: Get Innocuous, One Touch, Daft Punk Is Playing at My House, Us v Them, You Wanted a Hit, Tribulations, Freak Out, Movement, Yeah, Someone Great, Losing My Edge, Home, New York, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me DownEncore: Dance Yrself Clean, All My Friends[Cover photo via Brooklyn Vegan] In 2011, LCD Soundsystem said “The Long Goodbye,” playing a career-spanning performance at Madison Square Garden for what was billed as the band’s final show. Five years later, the group returned to New York, playing the much smaller Webster Hall for their first performance since 2011. When the news of LCD Soundsystem’s reunion first broke as a rumor, fans scoffed at the reported news. Shortly thereafter, however, James Murphy confirmed the news that the band was planning a reunion tour in 2016. With the LCD Soundsystem name popping up on the top of festival billings like Coachella, Panorama, Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza, fans have been eager to see just what the newly reformed would bring.Before hitting the major festivals, the group took the opportunity for a warm up with two nights in New York. Nearly five years to the day of their last show, the band opened up with “Get Innocuous” and never relented for a fantastic performance. The 15-song show featured a number of classics from the band’s repertoire, including “Daft Punk Is Playing At My House,” “Us v. Them,” “New York, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down,” and an encore of “Dance Yrself Clean” and “All My Friends.”While the group didn’t bust out any new material, it’s safe to say that fans went home happy after a great night of music! Watch some of the show below (the video turns right-side-up after a few seconds):last_img read more

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The Infamous Stringdusters Show Off New Songs, Cover Bill Monroe, The Cure, More In Charleston [Photos]

first_imgCharleston, SC welcomed The Infamous Stringdusters to an intimate theatre setting on Wednesday, April 3rd at The Charleston Music Hall. The Stringdusters are on tour promoting their album Rise Sun, which released tidat. With Bill Murray in attendance and Rise Sun at merch stands early, the band showed off songs from the album, dusted off some covers, and teased Grateful Dead tunes.The first set kicked off with their new single, “Rise Sun” which had bassist Travis Book flexing his vocals. “Rise Sun” gave way to a fiddle solo from Jeremy Garret that transitioned smoothly from the studio rendition. “Night on the River” off 2012’s Silver Sky came next with Garret and Chris Pandolfi (banjo) climbing to a very sharp peak. On the dark side of this summit laid a subtle tease of “Wharf Rat” leading into the first sequence of songs of the night.“Well Well” boasted well for Long Island’s Andy Falco on lead guitar. Falco moved up and down the frets showing off progressive guitar effects in a traditional bluegrass setting. This led the band to “Somewhere In Between” and treated Charleston to another song off the new album, “Drank”. Within “Drank”, the band crowded Hall as he kneeled for a screaming solo on dobro. “Drank” went into an unsuspecting “Foggy Mountain Breakdown” jam as a nod to the late Earl Scruggs. During a pause, Book pointed out how great it is to visit Charleston between the cuisine and hanging down on Folly Beach. The Stringdusters ran into “Peace of Mind” and their cover of the pop hit “Get Lucky” that got the seated crowd, stood up for and remained ready for the second set of a true General Admission show.Set two kicked off with a cover of Traveling Wilburys’ “End of the Line” and The Infamous Stringdusters hit “Gravity” that wrapped into a reprise by Andy Hall on dobro. Up next, was the single off their first album “Fork in the Road” with a brief Falco-led “Terrapin Station” tease. The second of three songs off 2017’s Laws of Gravity came next with “Back Home” leading way to yet another cover. This time Jimi Hendrix got the call with The Duster’s rendition of “Manic Depression”.The Infamous Stringdusters went to a string of originals with the heavily covered “Black Elk”, a song fresh off the new album, “Wake the Dead”, “1901: A Canyon Odyssey”, and “Let Me Know”. The final cover of set two was from The Cure with their 1987 song “Just Like Heaven” which was followed by “Hillbillies” to close out the show. After bowing out, The Stringdusters came right back for a quick and shuffling cover of the Bill Monroe classic “Uncle Pen” before leaving stage on their way up the coast with Jon Stickley Trio.The Infamous Stringdusters put on a good time in the days leading up to the release of what is promised to be their most quality album to date. The Dusters will be celebrating their album release for Rise Sun at 9:30 Club in Washington, DC tonight, April 5th. This performance is followed by a show at The National in Richmond, Virginia. Head to their website for tickets and info. Load remaining images Photo: Ellison Whitecenter_img Setlist: The Infamous Stringdusters | The Charleston Music Hall | Charleston, SC |4/3/19I: Rise Sun > Night River # > Well Well, Somewhere in Between > Drank, Foggy Mountain Breakdown^ Jam > Peace of Mind > Get LuckyII: End of the Line > Gravity % > Fork, Back Home > Manic Depression > Black Elk, Wake the Dead, Canyon, Let Me Know, Likes > HillbilliesEncore: Uncle Pen*# w/ Wharf Rat tease^ Earl Scruggz cover% Terrapin Station tease*Bill Monroe Coverlast_img read more

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Deep thinking

first_imgIn the laboratory of biology professor Gonzalo Giribet, students and fellows are playing “getting to know you” with a haul of rare limpets, deep sea scallops, cold water corals, and ribbon worms.The 100 or so specimens, gathered during a September cruise in the North Atlantic, will boost scientific knowledge of these mysterious creatures, some of which live 15,000 feet down, and bolster the Museum of Comparative Zoology’s invertebrate collections, of which Giribet is the faculty curator.“There are not a lot of samples, but some of them are very precious because there are very few specimens known from these depths,” Giribet said.Collecting is a key part of the work conducted in the Giribet’s lab, which focuses on the world’s invertebrates, which generally get less attention than better-known mammals, birds, fish, and reptiles.Giribet’s work focuses on the world of crustaceans, insects, snails, corals, and arachnids. He and his fellows and students travel the world sifting leaf litter and diving among reefs to expand knowledge of these little-known creatures. His lab studies invertebrates not only to learn more about their biology, but also about the locales in which they evolved. Noting similarities and differences between related species in different parts of the world, Giribet seeks to shed light on the planet’s geographical history.By visiting locations that scientists believe were once joined in the supercontinent of Gondwana — which contained many of today’s Southern Hemisphere landmasses — and examining creatures on either side of the rifts that eventually formed, Giribet can test those theories. Closely related creatures in eastern South America and West Africa, for example, would indicate they came from shared ancestor species.Just last summer, Giribet and some lab members traveled to West Africa to collect velvet worms in Cameroon and Gabon. With only one species of velvet worm there, Giribet said, it was important to collect samples to compare with velvet worms on Caribbean islands and in Central and South America.Other recent trips took researchers to New Zealand and Fiji. Trips to the Amazon and the Philippines are planned for the coming months.September’s North Atlantic scientific cruise provided samples from a little-known but biologically important area, the Galicia Bank off Spain. Giribet was one of several scientists invited to participate by the University of Santiago de Compostela, which organized the trip.The Galicia Bank features a seamount that rises from 15,000 feet deep to within 3,000 feet of the surface. It’s an area of enormous biological productivity and diversity, fed by upwelling waters that bring nutrients to the surface and feed a productive fishery. The area, proposed as a marine protected area by the World Wildlife Fund, is a day’s cruise from shore, Giribet said.“It’s a really amazing area,” Giribet said. “There’s a huge diversity of cold water, deep sea corals.”During 15 days at sea, researchers tested several collecting devices, including a benthic sledge, dragged along the seabed and then hauled back onto the ship. In water that deep, Giribet said, roughly six miles of wire had to be deployed before the sledge would reach the ocean bed, an operation that took three or four hours. They’d drag it for an hour and then haul it back aboard.“One operation at the deepest depths takes eight or nine hours. Then you have to process the samples,” Giribet said.With so much effort required for such a small time on the seafloor, the ship’s research ran around the clock, with the 60 people aboard divided into three teams on six-hour watches to keep the equipment running.“The worst was doing the night shift,” Giribet said.In addition to collecting specimens, Giribet said he was eager to see the ship in operation. Though he’d been collecting around the world for years, he hadn’t participated in deep oceanic collecting, with the important considerations of enormous pressures on top of logistical and scientific issues that would apply to other types of trips.Collecting is an important activity not just for scientists in Giribet’s lab, but also for his students. Work in the field can be an energizing experience, Giribet said, and allows students to put classroom knowledge into practice during scientific activities. Giribet organizes a collecting trip each year over spring break for students in his class called “Biology and Evolution of Invertebrate Animals.” Students spend a week exploring and collecting on Caribbean reefs.Each collecting trip requires far more lab time than field time to process, examine, and document the finds. Work in the Giribet lab on the North Atlantic specimens continues today. It involves taking DNA samples, photographing, dissecting, and describing the samples.“For us, it’s very important to collect,” Giribet said. “You can only work on these things if you go to these places.”last_img read more

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Nearer, better

first_imgAbsence makes your heart grow fonder, but close quarters may boost your career.According to new research by scientists at Harvard Medical School, the physical proximity of researchers, especially between the first and last author on published papers, strongly correlates with the impact of their work.“Despite all of the profound advances in information technology, such as video conferencing, we found that physical proximity still matters for research productivity and impact,” says Isaac Kohane, the Lawrence J. Henderson Professor of Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Boston and director of the Countway Library of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.The research was published in the Dec. 15 issue of PLoS ONE.Given that the Internet and social networks enable people to collaborate remotely, the researchers investigated whether proximity corresponded to the scientific impact of research as measured by citations of resulting publications.As part of the collocation-collaboration, or CoCo, project, Kohane and colleagues analyzed life sciences articles published by Harvard investigators from 1998 to 2003. They looked at researchers across four major research centers on Harvard campuses, for a total of 35,000 articles in 2,000 journals by 200,000 authors.In order to identify the locations of all authors at the time the studies were conducted, a team of Harvard undergraduates working with Kohane and Kyungjoon Lee, a research assistant at the Center for Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School, collected the physical locations of each author from the articles at the time of publication by obtaining floor plans and lists of building occupants from Harvard Medical School and affiliated hospitals’ human resources and facilities planning departments.The team then analyzed coordinates and geographic data of each location and developed a 3-D, high-resolution graphic to depict collaborations based on the locations throughout the Harvard campuses.Kohane and his colleagues investigated four types of author-distance relationships related to citations — first author/last author, first author/middle author, last author/middle author, and middle author/middle author — and looked at how citations could function as a measure of distance. The team categorized distance by tens of meters, which meant researchers working in the same building; hundreds of meters, or researchers working on the same campus; and thousands of meters, collaborations across different campuses within an institution.The researchers found that, on average, a paper with four or fewer authors who are located in the same building was cited 45 percent more than if the authors were in different buildings.  Generally, citations decreased as the distance between first and last authors increased.“Essentially, at all of these scales, the closer the first and last author are located, the more impactful that paper is as measured by how much more it is cited,” says Lee. “This finding was true when there were only two authors, but was also true with dozens of authors on the same paper.”Kohane and Lee suggest these findings will have implications for those who design research centers.“The question is, ultimately, which individuals do you want to bring together?” says Kohane. “If you want people to collaborate, these findings reinforce the need to create architectures and facilities that support frequent, physical interactions. Otherwise it’s really out of sight, out of mind.”He adds, “Researchers know what they’re doing when they fight for contiguous space.”This research was supported by grants from the Harvard University Office of the Provost and the Kauffman Foundation.last_img read more

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Global strike comes to Harvard

first_imgA crowd of college, high school, and elementary school students demanded action on climate change Friday, adding close to 1,000 voices to a massive daylong global protest by children and young people over the inadequate response by world leaders to the quickly worsening crisis.“At this moment, it doesn’t seem that a lot of people in the country who are over 25 take this seriously — or even believe it,” said Lamisha Khan, a senior at Cambridge Rindge and Latin, who said she walked out with around 70 other students from the school. “This is New England, and someone is holding a sign saying, ‘My kids may not see snow.’ ”The late morning rally on Harvard’s Science Center Plaza featured speeches and chants by a range of participants, from a former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] administrator to Cambridge civic leaders to Harvard faculty and students to Cambridge Rindge and Latin students. Even elementary students from Cambridge’s Vassal Lane Upper School got on stage, leading a call and response that began, “Kids against…” to which the crowd responded, “…climate change!”Speakers at the rally, organized by Fossil Fuel Divest Harvard, a student group pushing for the University to divest its endowment from any fossil fuel company stocks, said the day marked only the beginning of a push by the planet’s youth and their adult allies to take control of the climate problem and force those in positions of power to take notice and take action. Several in the crowd said the show of strength gave them hope that meaningful change is possible.“I see a lot of hope in being here,” said Harvard sophomore Rebecca Thrope. “When I was standing here 15 minutes before the rally began, it [the crowd] was really sparse. Then three giant groups all came; they walked out of class and missed school to be here.”Speakers conjured up images of rising seas and a dying planet. They recalled hurricane Dorian’s catastrophic hit on the Bahamas as a sign of things to come and criticized those who continue to deny climate science. They also warned of rising frequencies of mosquito borne ailments, like West Nile virus and eastern equine encephalitis, and said that social justice should be a key factor in solutions to the problem.,“Climate affects everyone, but not everyone equally,” said Saul Levin, a student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and member of the group Organizers for Radical Climate Action.Several speakers called on Harvard to divest its endowment of investments in fossil fuel companies, saying that failing to do so makes Harvard complicit in the damage being caused by climate change.Harvard President Larry Bacow addressed the issue recently in a Harvard Gazette piece, noting that continuing to engage with the fossil-fuel industry over climate change will bear more fruit than divestment. But debate over the issue, he wrote, is “healthy” and “will no doubt continue at Harvard and beyond.” The protest was put together as part of Friday’s Global Climate Strike. Teenage activist Greta Thunberg of Sweden, one of the organizers, estimated on Tuesday that there would be at least 4,600 events held in about 140 countries, an unprecedented mustering of young people anxious about life on a hotter planet and angered by the lack of urgency among adult leaders.The hourlong rally served as something of a warmup for the larger Climate Strike in Boston and many protesters left Harvard’s campus to head to City Hall Plaza, where the Boston rally was to begin before moving to the nearby State House on Boston Common.Gina McCarthy, EPA administrator under President Obama and director of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Center for Climate, Health and the Global Environment, was among the Harvard rally speakers. She fired up the crowd, saying real strength comes from their standing together and urging them to do more than chant slogans and to get to work. Much being done to battle it, Bacow says, yet there’s far more to do “I get up every morning, and I’m pissed off for two minutes, then I get over it,” McCarthy said. “We can make this challenge happen; we can take climate action into our own hands. We don’t need the federal government; we need ourselves.”McCarthy decried those who deny the facts of climate change, are blind to inequalities of climate change’s effects, and leaders who fail to lead on the issue.“You deserve better leadership — vote for it,” McCarthy said. “Events are great, but what you do tomorrow is what matters.” Harvard joins Climate Action 100+ Facing up to climate change Management Company to engage directly with world’s top carbon emitters to address climate change Relatedlast_img read more

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University, team honor Sullivan

first_imgThe memory of Declan Sullivan permeated campus Saturday, from the band’s pre-game performances to Irish coach Brian Kelly’s post-game press conference. The football team honored Sullivan with a moment of silence immediately following the national anthem, as well as a prayer led by University President Fr. John Jenkins. Notre Dame and Tulsa players also wore green shamrock helmet decals emblazoned with the letters “DS” in black. Prior to kickoff, the band dedicated its Trumpets in the Dome performance to Sullivan, and played the Alma Mater at the conclusion of its halftime performance. After Notre Dame’s loss to Tulsa, Kelly remembered Sullivan, who he estimated was one of only a dozen student workers he has known personally over his 20-year coaching career. “I got a chance to meet Declan and know him because of all the time he spent in our office, especially this summer,” Kelly said. “As you know, he was a lover of film and writing … I’ve got great memories of him just being in the film and video offices. “You know, you think you’re strong and able to handle all of those things that are thrown at you.  This one was very difficult.”last_img read more

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Lucie Arnaz Flies Into Pippin on Broadway

first_imgLucie Arnaz will return to Broadway as Berthe in Pippin at the Music Box Theatre. She will play a limited engagement October 9 through November 9, taking over from Priscilla Lopez. Lopez begins performances in the role of the flying Granny tonight, September 23, after Andrea Martin completed her run on September 21. Arnaz is playing the role of Berthe in the Pippin national tour which opens this week at the Golden Gate Theatre in San Francisco, CA. Her career has spanned over 45 years in show business, beginning with a recurring role on TV’s The Lucy Show, opposite her mother, Lucille Ball. New York stage credits include They’re Playing Our Song, Lost in Yonkers, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels and Grace and Glorie. Her screen credits include The Jazz Singer (Golden Globe Nomination), Down To You, Second Thoughts, Billy Jack Goes To Washington, The Lucie Arnaz Show, Sons And Daughters, The Black Dahlia, The Mating Season, Who Gets The Friends? and Washington Mistress. Pippin features music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz and a book by Roger O. Hirson and tells the story of a young prince searching for his corner of the sky. The current cast of the Tony-winning revival includes Kyle Dean Massey as Pippin, Carly Hughes as Leading Player, John Dossett as Charles, Charlotte d’Amboise as Fastrada and Rachel Bay Jones as Catherine. Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015 Pippin Related Shows View Commentslast_img read more

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How to conduct your credit union’s best planning session ever

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Before you know it, strategic planning season will be in full swing. Every credit union takes time to build their plan for the upcoming years. But do they do plannning well? Sometimes we leave those strategic planning sessions frustrated, uninspired or even disappointed in the outcomes.How do you take those strategy sessions from boring exercises in futility to engaging moments filled with hope and a positive sense of direction? Besides throwing out the SWOT, there are several practical steps you can take to improve your next meeting focused on long-range issues.Here are five practical suggestions to have the best planning session ever:Address issues honestly—Nothing will ruin a planning session more than a group of people who agree on every issue. Make sure your team engages in lively debate. It’s okay to disagree. And the key word here is “honestly.” Too many times we hold back in meetings. Some people are afraid to speak their mind. Eliminate that attitude in your session. One way to address issues honestly is before the meeting have everyone write down their answers to this question, “What is the elephant in the room issue we must address in this session?” continue reading »last_img read more

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Connect with Hispanic members and staff during National Hispanic Heritage Month

first_imgNational Hispanic Heritage Month (HHM), a celebration of Hispanic and Latino culture, heritage and contributions, begins September 15 and continues through October 15 each year.The celebration starts on September 15 because on that day in 1821, five Latin American countries declared their independence: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico, Chile and Belize celebrate their independence days on September 16, September 18 and September 21, respectively.HHM presents a great opportunity for credit unions to connect with and support their Hispanic members and staff. Here are a few examples:Altura Credit Union in Riverside, Calif., recognizes HHM by promoting a variety of community festivals, contest and events on its website. The credit union also made a $600,000 pledge to the Cheech Marin Center for Chicano Art, Culture & Industry at the Riverside Art Museum earlier this year.Idaho Central Credit Union in Chubbuck, Idaho, sponsors several activities during HHM, including Fiestas Patrias (Mexico’s Independence Day celebration), an All About the Dress Expo and a Latino Expo.1st Bergen Federal Credit Union in Hackensack, N.J., hosted a HHM celebration where the credit union shared its commitment to serve and empower members of the Hispanic community. The event included music and dancing, refreshments and special promotions, including low-interest loans, savings accounts and checking accounts.Another way to celebrate HHM is to create a way for your Hispanic staff and members to share stories about their favorite traditions from their countries of origin. Along those lines, we thought it would be fun to share a bit about where the Coopera team came from and our favorite traditions from those countries. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Indonesia reports 115th human H5N1 case

first_imgDec 12, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Indonesia has reported its 115th human case of H5N1 avian influenza, in a 47-year-old man from Tangerang, according to news services.The man is in critical condition in a Jakarta hospital, according to a Xinhua report today. Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported that he fell ill on Dec 2, was hospitalized in Tangerang Dec 5, and was referred to the Jakarta hospital Dec 10.Tangerang, a western suburb of Jakarta, was also the home of a 28-year-old woman who died of avian flu Dec 10. Her case was recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) today.Joko Suyono of Indonesia’s avian flu center said the 47-year-old man kept ducks at his home and had recently traveled to Medan in Sumatra and Pandeglang in West Java, according to a Reuters report today.Suyono said two tests had confirmed the man’s infection, and the agriculture ministry was investigating how he contracted the virus, Reuters reported.Ninety-two of Indonesia’s 115 H5N1 cases have been fatal. The WHO’s global H5N1 count, which does not yet include the Tangerang man, stands at 338 cases with 208 deaths.The WHO count shows 75 cases with 50 deaths so far this year, as compared with 115 cases and 79 deaths for all of 2006. The 2006 toll was the highest so far.See also: WHO statement on case of 28-year-old woman from Tangeranghttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2007_12_12/en/index.htmllast_img read more