Posted in knuaeqsoveoz

Renewables have accounted for 36% of Spain’s 2019 electricity generation through November

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renewables Now:The share of renewables in electricity generation in Spain jumped to 48.6% this November from 30.4% recorded the month before, according to provisional data by Spanish grid operator Red Electrica de Espana (REE).During the first 11 months of the year, 36.2% of all electricity in the country was produced from renewables.Spain’s wind farms produced 7,396 GWh in November, up 62.2% year-on-year, and succeeded in dethroning nuclear power. The wind share rose to 32.7% from 18.1% estimated in October.Spain’s demand for electricity declined by 0.4% year-on-year to an estimated 21,966 GWh in November, and by 1.7% to 242,395 GWh in the first 11 months of 2019.The Spanish mainland registered a drop in demand to 20,785 GWh, down by 0.6% year-on-year in November, with renewables producing 50.4% of all electricity. Production from wind farms grew to 7,271 GWh, registering a 60.6% year-on-year boost. The share of wind power in the peninsula reached 33.8%.More: Spain’s renewables hit 48.6% share with Nov wind power Renewables have accounted for 36% of Spain’s 2019 electricity generation through Novemberlast_img read more

Posted in knuaeqsoveoz

You can’t have Google’s culture…but you can have something better

first_imgContributing Author: Amy Rapp, VirtualCorps 37SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Ken Bator Ken Bator, owner of Bator Training & Consulting, Inc., has more than 20 years of experience in helping organizations reach new levels of effectiveness by aligning their brand, culture, and … Web: www.btcinc.net Details Earlier this past spring, Deb Schaffer of Chatter Yak! posted a great article titled:  “Have you woven together your credit union’s marketing efforts, brand, and culture?” here in the CUInsight Community article section. After reading her article, one area that I was struck by and nodded my head in agreement with was her wise insight about the following statement that so many CUs and other mainstream businesses misinterpret about Brand Culture:“Too many people say (when referring to their logo), “But, that is our brand.” Your organization’s brand is not a color or image. Your brand is the emotion that people feel when thinking about your organization or seeing your logo. Much like culture is not what you say, a brand is not what you do…but rather, how you make people FEEL….Make sure your marketing efforts and brand truthfully tell your members who you are, what you do, and leave them feeling something positive.”CUs have been notorious for stating the philosophy of serving the undeserved, of promoting financial literacy; we believe in the philosophy of the movement and seek to live out that philosophy. However, how good are you, REALLY, at defining your CUs brand culture? Do you make the members feel positive? Or, is your brand culture disguised in the form of something else and you have deluded yourself along with your staff into thinking that you really have a brand culture that works well? How’s your growth? How’s engagement or participation in CU events? What types of feedback are you soliciting and are you willing to address the areas that may need some attention, specifically your brand culture?Here is an article written by Ken Bator, which defines a few additional steps on Brand Culture, that I want to share with you. Maybe you think it’s a culture like Google you’re after. As Ken states, it’s your own brand culture that you’re looking for, if you never have found it. Be yourself – be authentic.Google’s Brand Culture“I want to have a culture like Google!” I’ve heard this type of statement more than once from potential clients. Usually it’s from tech entrepreneurs that want to emulate a well-known brand. The last time I heard it was from the founder of an industrial lighting company of all places.Too their chagrin I informed them that they couldn’t have Google’s culture. Their essence will always be uniquely theirs. Just as Home Depot’s culture will always be theirs, Southwest Airlines’ culture will always be theirs, and Pete’s Body Shop and Sushi will always be theirs.While there is usually a furrowed brow for a few seconds when I tell prospects this, I get a smile when I explain that they can have something better. That “something better” is something uniquely their own.A culture is the sum of a few key elements including the people that comprise the organization, their attitudes and personalities, and what the leadership will continually reinforce. Even if you recruited employees from Google they wouldn’t have the same environment and wouldn’t have the exact same culture guidance.While there may be a few elements you would like to mimic, steal, borrow, or copy from cultures of other businesses it would be just that. Much like I tell credit unions when they tell me “I want to implement a sales culture,” wouldn’t you like to build your own distinctive culture that works uniquely for your business rather than try to stamp another organization’s process or set of principles on your company as if it were a sticker?In the continuum of brand, culture, and strategy alignment – what I call B + C + S formula – it is often the “C” which is the most elusive and the hardest to figure out. This is particularly important, as it is the culture that supports the brand and allows it to flourish. It is also the culture that allows for proper implementation of the strategy. A dysfunctional culture will only tarnish the brand and place speedbumps, or even brick walls, on the road to strategy execution.So how do you build a unique and aligned culture? Here are a few critical first steps:Define your company values. The values are one of five organization drivers of the B + C + S formula. Much like the mission statement is the “why we are in business” and the vision statement is the “where we’re going” the values are the “who we are.” These are the non-negotiables that we need to exemplify on a daily basis that provide the foundation to our culture. For example, maybe you want to create a laid back atmosphere but also one of respect for each other. In that instance you may decide to not have “professional appearance” as one of the values as you want people to dress comfortably without a dress code. However, you may adopt a value of “timeliness.” While people can dress however they want, you still want to make sure each employee respects each other’s time by being on time.Work with the entire team to develop service standards. Service standards are the fifth element of the aforementioned organization drivers. They are the “how we are going to live our values every day.” It’s critical that you elicit the opinions, guidance, and help of your team in this process. Doing so creates instant buy in and develops a “We’re all in this together” feeling within the culture. Keeping with the example introduced above, you would ask staff what “timeliness” means to them and ask them to define it into a standard for your business. The staff may then develop service standards such as “We will arrive to meetings five minutes prior to their start times” and “We will provide proposals to clients a day earlier than promised.”Reinforce the heck out of both the values and service standards. Celebrate what you have created together. Put the values and service standards on laminated cards, on posters in the lunchroom, on the company intranet, etc. Use the language of the values and service standards during meetings, one-on-ones, reviews, mentoring sessions, reprimands, and coffee breaks. Remember that employees are your first customers. Like customers and prospects they need to see a message multiple times before they truly “get it.” So when you feel like you have reinforced the values and service standards too much go ahead and reinforce them again.Following these steps may not create a culture like Google within your business but you may find that you are creating something better. That “something better” may also be just what you need to guide your team to greatness. And, by the way, if you ever do come across a Pete’s Body Shop and Sushi franchise please let me know.last_img read more

Posted in knuaeqsoveoz

Missing woman found safe by authorities

first_img—– DOB: Dec. 25, 1935Height: 5 feetWeight: 150 poundsEyes: BrownHair: Gray She was last seen wearing a light-blue sweatshirt, light-blue denim jeans, polka-dot socks and tan slip-on sneakers. She could be wearing glasses. Anyone with information about Jeuck’s whereabouts is asked to contact the Broome County Sheriff’s Office at 607-778-1911 or 607-778-2053 for detectives. You may also reach out to deputies on the department’s social media pages. The sheriff’s office noted Jeuck does not have oxygen with her. Jeuck’s description: The woman, Joyce S. Jeuck, left a relative’s house in Chenango Bridge Sunday around 5:45 p.m. toward the town of Kirkwood. She was last seen on the Vestal Parkway around 8:45 p.m. in a tan 2010 Toyota RAV-4. Her license plate is number is 616542 and has the handicapped symbol on it. (WBNG) — The Broome County Sheriff’s office needs the public’s help in finding an 84-year-old missing woman who suffers from dementia and is oxygen dependent. (WBNG) — The sheriff’s office says Jeuck has been found safe and healthy.last_img read more

Posted in knuaeqsoveoz

Studies point up pandemic demand on critical care resources

first_imgOct 12, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – A collection of new studies is demonstrating once again the ability of the pandemic H1N1 virus to make some people desperately sick and is raising questions about the potential strain on critical-care resources this fall and winter.Researchers in Mexico and Canada reported that severely ill patients in the early weeks and months of the epidemic spent upwards of 12 days in intensive care units (ICUs) on mechanical ventilation, according to two reports published online today by the Journal of the American Medical Association.About 17% of the Canadian patients and 41% of the Mexican patients died. Both groups were relatively young overall, and sizable minorities were obese. Hospitals in both countries struggled to meet the demand for intensive care, and four of the Mexican patients died before they could get into the ICU.A third report says that 68 patients with confirmed or suspected H1N1 in Australia and New Zealand were treated with the sophisticated heart-lung bypass technology called extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) during the countries’ recent winter flu season. The patients, most of whom were young, were on the treatment for a median of 10 days, and 14 of them (21%) died.Given that 80% to 90% of ICU beds are filled at any given time, the findings suggest that the US critical care system could come under heavy strain as the pandemic spreads this fall and winter, several professionals involved in critical care told CIDRAP News.They agreed with two JAMA editorial writers who said the studies highlight the need for hospitals to “develop explicit policies to equitably determine who will and will not receive life support should absolute scarcity occur.”Canadian and Mexican studiesThe Canadian researchers, a large team led by Anand Kumar of St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg, Man., gathered data on all H1N1 patients treated in Canadian ICUs from Apr 16 through Aug 12. They identified 162 confirmed cases and 6 probable ones.The mean age of the patients was 32.3 years, and 50 were children. A third of the patients were obese, and 67% were female, a gender imbalance that was unexplained. The group included 43 aboriginal Canadians, and 52 patients were from the greater Winnipeg region.Eighty-one percent of the patients required mechanical ventilation for a median of 12 days, which was also their median time in intensive care. Fifty-one patients had major underlying conditions, with chronic lung disease, obesity, hypertension, and smoking the most common. Evidence of bacterial pneumonia was seen in 24%. The death toll was 29 patients (17%), including four children.Critical care capacity in the Winnipeg area was “seriously challenged” at the peak of the outbreak in June, with all regional ICU beds filled, much as in the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) epidemic in Toronto in 2003, the report says.In Mexico, researchers tracked 58 patients who were critically ill with confirmed or suspected H1N1 cases at six hospitals from March 24 to Jun 1. They were among 899 patients with confirmed or suspected cases who were admitted to the hospitals during that time; many of them faced delays in admission to the ICU, and four died in emergency departments.The median age of the patients was 44.2 years; only two were children. Obesity was the most common “comorbid” condition, found in 21 (36%) of the 58 patients, followed by smoking, hypertension, and diabetes.All but two patients received mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Twenty-four patients (41%) died. Those who survived were in the ICU a median of 13.5 days and on a ventilator a median of 15 days (many received ventilation outside the ICU).In the JAMA editorial, Douglas B. White, MD, MAS, and Derek C. Angus, MD, MPH, write that the similarities in the main findings of the Canadian and Mexican studies are striking. They cited the relatively young age of the patients and the prolonged and severe hypoxemia, which required frequent use of rescue therapies. They also note that there were no documented cases of nosocomial transmission of H1N1 in either case series.ECMO cases Down UnderThe third report, by a large team called the Australia and New Zealand Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Influenza Investigators, covers all patients treated with ECMO for H1N1-related ARDS in the two countries from June through August.The group identified 68 patients with confirmed (61) or suspected (7) H1N1 at the 15 institutions that had ECMO capability. Their median age was 34 years; there were three children and no elderly people. The most common underlying conditions were obesity, in 50%; asthma, 28%, and diabetes, 15%. Another 15% of the patients were pregnant or in the postpartum period.Fourteen patients died by the close of the study period, while another 6 remained in intensive care.The report says the 68 patients represent an ECMO treatment rate of 2.6 per million people, and the ECMO capacity was never exceeded. Given a similar incidence of ECMO use for H1N1 patients, “rough estimates are that the United States and European Union might expect to provide ECMO to approximately 800 and 1,300 patients” this winter, the authors state.Possible shortages aheadSeveral experts involved in critical care said the reports released today suggest the potential for rough times ahead, given the small surge capacity in the US critical care system.For example, Daniel O’Laughlin, MD, medical director for emergency preparedness at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis, said that only 10% of the 513 adult, acute-care ICU beds in the Twin Cities area were unfilled at the time of an assessment in early September.Likewise, John L. Hick, MD, an emergency medicine physician and director of disaster preparedness at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, commented by e-mail, “We know that most days we are running 80-90% capacity (and a few weeks ago had to cancel a few elective cases due to lack of ICU beds), so it won’t take much to bring the house down.”Last February, said O’Laughlin, several hospitals in the region ran out of ventilators, for reasons unrelated to flu. They couldn’t obtain any extra ones from suppliers immediately and therefore had to postpone some elective procedures that would’ve required the machines.The JAMA reports also make clear that not just any ventilator will be adequate for treating patients with severe H1N1 illness, according to Robert Dunne, MD, vice chief of emergency medicine at St. John Hospital and Medical Center in Detroit.”There are stockpiles of ventilators, but they tend to be very simple ventilators more for nerve agents” such as botulinum toxin, he said. “Very complex ventilation is needed in these flu patients, and these stockpiled vents may be of use to free up better ventilators but likely have little use for the flu patients.”Given the geographic progression of disease, it may be possible to move vents from areas that are having decreased activity to areas that are starting to peak, but this requires a national strategy that is not there at this time.”Nick Kuhnley, manager of respiratory care at North Memorial Medical Center in Robbinsdale, Minn., said sophisticated ventilators are needed in particular for patients who are obese, which was the case for many of those in the JAMA reports.”The common factor for that is that these people are extremely difficult to ventilate; they’re very restricted,” he said. “It’s the same exact problem as for pregnant women—you’ve encroached on your thoracic space. When you get the pneumonias in a restricted lung, it is very severe.”Kuhnley said many hospitals have a “hodgepodge” of ventilators. He said his center has 10 that are “high-acuity,” and another 19 are medium acuity, adding, “Medium-acuity ones may or may not be effective for a lot of these severe cases.”However, O’Laughlin said ventilators in state and federal stockpiles, while not as sophisticated as some high-end models, would be adequate for most patients, including most influenza patients.Another resource that could cause problems in the pandemic is the tubing, or circuits, that connect a ventilator to the patient’s airway, said Kuhnley. He said hospitals and health officials in Minnesota have been working to ensure an adequate supply of circuits and have made progress in the past year, so that they should be able to weather the pandemic, provided the distribution system remains “mostly intact.”But he said hospitals in other states may not be as well prepared.The experts noted that the availability of ECMO is very limited in the United States, as is true in Australia and New Zealand. Dunne said probably only one or two institutions in each state or region have the capability.”Since [ECMO] is not ‘standard of care,’ it is not included in preparedness efforts, and maybe it should not be,” O’Laughlin commented. “Some discussion of this is important especially given the pediatric case mix.”First pandemic in critical care eraA noteworthy aspect of the H1N1 situation is that it’s the first pandemic to occur since critical care emerged as a specialty, said O’Laughlin.”I think one of the key things is that both the Canadian and Mexican articles identified that most of the patients that did present requiring critical care resources could be supported through the illness,” he said. “This is the first pandemic we’ve experienced in the era of critical care medicine. . . . We do have the ability to utilize these critical care resources and have an impact on the patients that have experienced the 2009 H1N1 influenza and have success in having them recover.”But he cautioned that there will be difficult choices if and when ICU space and equipment run short in the course of the pandemic. “That’s where it becomes absolutely necessary for hospitals to have those discussions on how to equitably distribute the scarce resources,” he said.Kumar A, Zarychanski R, Pinto R, et al. Critically ill patients with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) infection in Canada. JAMA 2009 Oct 12;302(17):(Early online publication) [Full text]Dominguez-Cherit G, Lapinsky SE, Macias AE, et al. Critically ill patients with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) in Mexico. JAMA 2009 Oct 12;302(17):(Early online publication) [Full text]The Australia and New Zealand Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Influenza Investigators. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for 2009 influenza A (H1N1) acute respiratory distress syndrome. JAMA 2009 Oct 12;302(17):(Early online publication) [Full text]White DB, Angus DC. Preparing for the sickest patients with 2009 influenza A (H1N1). (Editorial) JAMA 2009 Oct 12;302(17):(Early online publication)last_img read more

Posted in knuaeqsoveoz

Sheds are not fashion victims

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Posted in knuaeqsoveoz

Italy extends coronavirus state of emergency

first_imgTopics : The decree had been set to expire on July 31. Italy’s Senate on Tuesday night gave its approval to extend the state of emergency, followed by the chamber of deputies on Wednesday, which voted 286 to 221 for the measure, with five abstentions.”Unfortunately, the pandemic today is not fully over, even though its effects are more contained and geographically limited,” Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said Wednesday, assuring MPs that the extension did not necessarily mean new lockdowns.More then 35,000 people have died due to coronavirus in Italy, which has seen more than 246,000 infections. Italy’s parliament on Wednesday gave the go-ahead to extend the country’s state of emergency until October 15, allowing the government more flexibility to fight the lingering coronavirus pandemic.The state of emergency serves primarily to cut red tape and accelerate decision-making for the government when faced with disasters such as earthquakes, floods and other catastrophes.Italy was the first European country to be hit by the coronavirus crisis and a more than two-month lockdown dealt a severe blow the economy.last_img read more

Posted in knuaeqsoveoz

FERC selects Prima Strategic Group as LNG inspection partner

first_imgIllustration purposes only (Image courtesy of Prima Strategic Group)Prima Strategic Group has been awarded a five-year contract by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to provide support to perform post authorization compliance inspections of LNG projects being constructed in the United States of America.The contract scope includes performing LNG post authorization compliance inspections of all the LNG projects currently being constructed in the United States.The first contract period started in February this year, Prima Strategic Group said in a statement.“It is our highly important association with FERC, as these projects are very critical to the American energy industry and our LNG experts will play an important role in minimizing the risks associated with these projects to the communities these will be operated,” said Mohan Sharma, CEO and managing director of Prima Strategic Group.Sharma noted the LNG inspection company has been working with FERC for the past several months, making inspections visits to LNG projects.last_img read more

Posted in knuaeqsoveoz

Transgender kids: Have we gone too far?

first_imgThe Globe and Mail 15 February 2014What happens when your son tells you he’s really a girl? Twenty years ago, you probably would have crossed your fingers and tried to wait it out. Today, you might buy him a whole new wardrobe, find someone to prescribe hormone blockers, and help him live as a girl. Maybe he’ll even become a celebrity. A recent Maclean’s magazine cover, posing that very question, featured a lovely 11-year-old with long, flowing locks and enormous eyes. His name used to be Oliver. Suddenly transgender kids are everywhere – in the news, on Dr. Phil and in your neighbourhood. School boards have developed detailed transgender policies. Clinics to treat transgender kids have sprung up. A condition that used to be vanishingly rare, perhaps one in 10,000 children or less, now seems common. In a random sampling of 6th- to 8th-graders in San Francisco, kids were asked if they identified as male, female or transgendered – 1.3 per cent checked off the transgendered box.What’s going on? To find out, I sat down with Dr. Ken Zucker, one of the world’s foremost authorities on gender identity issues in children and adolescents. As head of the Gender Identity Service at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, he has worked with hundreds of kids like Olie. “The No. 1 factor is the Internet,” he said. “If you’re struggling to find out where you fit, the Internet is filled with things about gender dysphoria.” But for kids, especially younger ones, the issue is much more problematic. Gender confusion is often temporary. About three-quarters of little kids who have issues with their gender – boys who want to be princesses, girls who throw their dresses in the garbage – will be comfortable with it by adolescence, according to Dr. Zucker. (Many of them will grow up to be gay or bi.) Gender confusion can also be a handy label for whatever ails a child (or her family). That’s why Dr. Zucker takes a watch-and-wait approach. He even advises parents of princessy six-year-olds to say, “You’re not a girl. You’re a boy.”…Alice Dreger is a bioethicist and professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. She calls herself an (im)patient advocate who prefers evidence to ideology. She is a strong supporter of transgender rights. But she thinks the pendulum has swung too far. One reason is that social norms have dramatically changed. It is now fashionable to embrace your diverse child. Parents who encourage their kids to change gender “are socially rewarded as wonderful and accepting,” while parents who try to take it slow “are seen as unaccepting, lacking in affection and conservative,” she says. These days, parents who don’t like the slow-and-careful answer can shop for another one. Ms. Dreger is highly critical of what she calls the “hasty clinics,” which are happy to help a kid transition right away. “Parents don’t like uncertainty,” she says. “They’d rather be told, ‘Here’s the diagnosis, and it’s all gonna turn out fine.’” Teenagers can find fast help, too. Plenty of doctors are happy to help them out with hormone treatments just for the asking. For some people, including some adolescents, transgender treatment is lifesaving. But these treatments are neither simple nor benign. They may, among other things, retard maturation, suppress your growth or render you sterile. And in the end, medical science cannot create a body that makes you forget you were born the other sex. “Some kids need it, but for the kids who don’t, it’s dangerous,” she says. “All else being equal, it’s better to avoid long-term hormone therapy and major surgery that removes a lot of tissue.”http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/transgender-kids-have-we-gone-too-far/article16897043/last_img read more

Posted in knuaeqsoveoz

Minister concerned about impact of Bahamas crime report

first_img 14 Views   no discussions NewsRegional Minister concerned about impact of Bahamas crime report by: – May 22, 2012 Share Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img Tweet Share Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe is concerned about possible long-term effects of the recently released US report on The Bahamas crime situation, in which it noted a “critical” threat level in New Providence and a “high” threat level in Grand Bahama. TNG file photoNASSAU, Bahamas — Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe said on Sunday he is concerned about the possible long-term effects a recently released US report on The Bahamas’ crime situation could have on the country’s number one industry.Wilchcombe said he plans to work closely with police to ensure that tourist areas are well patrolled and safe.His comments came several days after the US State Department report on the country’s crime situation noted a “critical” threat level in New Providence and a “high” threat level in Grand Bahama.“Certainly we are very concerned about it,” Wilchcombe told The Nassau Guardian.“We have to now do something about it. My job as minister of tourism is on the one hand to assure our visitors that it’s going to be safe here, but also do something meaningful to make sure it’s safe here.“We’re going to be looking at some of the areas they talked about, the hotels, the beaches, to be sure that there is sufficient lighting, to make sure there is personnel there to man these areas.“These areas have to be better policed, better protected. We have to do all we possibly can to assist.”Wilchcombe said he is optimistic about the crime fighting strategies the Progressive Liberal Party administration plans to unveil in the coming weeks. But he said he knows how damaging it can be for the country’s reputation to be known as an unsafe place for travelers.“The truth is we’ve seen many other Caribbean nations affected by reports of high incidents of crime,” he said.“In particular, we’ve seen what happened in Jamaica more than 20 years ago when similar reports were emanating [from there]. Throughout the Caribbean, countries are concerned that if those reports escalate and if incidents escalate their industries would be impacted.”The recently released report said that there was a dramatic increase in general crimes in 2011.“New Providence island, in particular, has experienced a spike in crime that has adversely affected the traveling public,” said the Bahamas 2012 Crime and Safety Report.“Armed robberies, property theft, purse snatchings, and general theft of personal property remain the most common crimes against tourists. There has been a dramatic increase in general crimes in 2011.“In previous years, most violent crimes involved mainly Bahamian citizens and occurred in ‘Over-the-Hill’ areas, which are not frequented by tourists.”The report added that in 2011 numerous incidents were reported that involved tourists or happened in tourist areas like Prince George Wharf and Cable Beach.By Taneka ThompsonNassau Guardian Senior Reporterlast_img read more

Posted in knuaeqsoveoz

Torres relishing Milan adventure

first_img “It will be a nice challenge trying to get back into the top three in the league and subsequently have the chance to play in the Champions League next year. Then, why not try and win something already this year? I’m expecting good things from this season.” Much was expected of Torres when he arrived at Chelsea from Liverpool in January 2011 for what was a British record fee, but he fell well short of living up to his £50million price tag. He now appears to have played his last match for the Blues, and has set his sights on being with Milan for “many years”. “I thank the fans for the welcome,” he said. “Through the social network sites and my official website I’ve seen that they are as happy as I am. I am sure that it will all go well. “I can promise that I will give 100 per cent and that with their help this experience will be fantastic and for many years, I hope.” Inzaghi, speaking at his pre-match press conference ahead of Sunday’s Serie A opener against Lazio, backed Torres to help the Rossoneri get back to the top, should the deal go through as expected. “It isn’t yet official for Torres,” the Milan head coach said. “If he joins it is because everybody thinks he can be a useful player. “He is always the first to arrive to training and very professional. We are rebuilding and we are on the right path. One step at a time, we will get back to the top.” Chelsea boss Jose Mourinho spoke glowingly of Torres on Friday, before news emerged of his imminent exit, and Inzaghi too has been impressed by what he knows of the Spaniard so far. “I spoke to Mourinho to find out about what kind of man Torres is,” Inzaghi said. “He is a player that has scored lots of goals and you don’t forget this all of a sudden. “He has the right attributes from a human point of view and that is good.” Inzaghi preferred to concentrate on Lazio’s visit to the San Siro than speculate as to any further acquisitions he may be looking to make before Monday night’s transfer deadline. “Apart from Torres, I don’t think it is right to speak about the transfer market,” he said. “I want to focus on the match. We want to do really well. “My only thought is on this debut which I really care about, in our stadium and with our people. We want to win back the fans.” Torres told the Milan Channel he could not wait to get started working under coach Filippo Inzaghi after a frustrating and underwhelming three and a half years at Stamford Bridge. “I’m really happy to have arrived in Milan,” he said. “I can’t wait to do the medical, meet the fans and my new team-mates. “I cannot wait to start this new adventure. I spoke to the coach (on Friday) and I am really pleased to work with a coach like him. He was a great goalscorer and definitely understands what the role of a striker is. I am sure that he can teach me and help me a lot in this adventure.” Torres revealed he had nearly become a Milan player before leaving Atletico Madrid for Liverpool in 2007. “I was close to joining Milan when I was at Atletico Madrid, but we’re talking about many years ago,” he said. “A long time has since passed. I’ve now finally arrived at Milan. Playing for Milan isn’t easy. It’s an honour and a privilege to wear this shirt. I want to give my best and help the side have a great season.” The Rossoneri endured a dismal Serie A campaign last term, finishing eighth, 45 points behind champions Juventus, and missing out on European competition for the first time in 16 years. Head coach Inzaghi, who was promoted from the youth team at the end of last season following Clarence Seedorf’s dismissal, faces a challenging task to restore Milan’s pride, but Torres is relishing the prospect. “When you play for Milan, there are always big expectations,” he said. “After a difficult season, all the players and the fans want to get back into the Champions League and fight for trophies. Press Association Fernando Torres spoke of his excitement at the new chapter in his career after arriving in Milan to finalise his move from Chelsea. The Blues and AC Milan announced the agreement of a two-year loan deal on Friday evening, taking the 30-year-old to the expiration of his Chelsea contract in 2016. The Rossoneri confirmed on Twitter on Saturday that Torres had landed at Milan’s Linate Airport, where he was greeted by 200 fans, and posted a picture of the player holding an AC Milan scarf before announcing he was at the Madonnina Clinic undergoing his medical. last_img read more