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A Gentleman’s Guide Star Bryce Pinkham is Broadway.com’s Next Vlogger

first_img Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 17, 2016 Can a camera be used as a weapon? We sure hope not. Tony nominee Bryce Pinkham has returned to A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, and this time, he vlogging all about it. Brace yourselves for Full Monty: Backstage at A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder with Bryce Pinkham.The devilish leading man will give us a peak of life at the Walter Kerr Theatre, where it’s kill or be killed. Well, at least on stage. Expect kooky appearances from fellow co-stars Jefferson Mays (all eight versions of him), Scarlett Strallen, Catherine Walker and more.Pinkham received a Tony nod for originating the role of Monty in A Gentleman’s Guide. He recently took a hiatus to appear in the revival of The Heidi Chronicles; his additional Great White Way credits include Ghost and Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson.Written by Robert L. Freedman and Steven Lutvak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder follows Monty Navarro, a long-lost member of a noble family who stands to become the next Earl of Highhurst—if he can eliminate the eight other relatives (all played by Mays) who precede him in line for the title.Full Monty will kick off on August 10 and air every Monday for eight weeks. Star Files A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder Bryce Pinkham View Commentslast_img read more

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Renewables generated nearly 45% of Great Britain’s electricity in the first quarter

first_imgRenewables generated nearly 45% of Great Britain’s electricity in the first quarter FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:The first three months of 2020 were a landmark quarter for Great Britain, with renewable providing more power than from any other major power source, providing 45% of all electricity generation, and beating out total fossil fuel generation, including coal and gas.The milestone moment was highlighted in European power analysts EnAppSys’ latest quarterly energy market report, covering the first three months of 2020.In total, across the first quarter, renewable energy generated 35.4TWh, accounting for 44.6% of all power generation across Great Britain, followed by 29.1% from gas-fired power plants, 15.3% from nuclear power, 7.3% from imports, and only 3.7% from coal.This means that not only did renewables generated more electricity than any other power source, but also means in turn that renewables beat out all fossil fuels combined (gas plus coal).There were a number of factors which helped lead to this milestone moment, with extreme weather conditions across the first three months of the year in Great Britain resulting in consistently high levels of wind generation. Similarly, as with many countries around the world, the spreading coronavirus pandemic led to declining electricity demand in March.Despite the contributing factors, this is nevertheless an important milestone for Great Britain’s electricity sector, as its renewable electricity generation was already on track to overtake fossil fuels this year based on historical trends.[Joshua Hill]More: Renewables were Britain’s main power source in first quarterlast_img read more

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Back to the basics

first_imgAs I sit and type this on my front porch, the beauty of the day today almost makes me giggle.Spring has hit in full swing, and this promises to be a gorgeous week in the mountains.  As I organize myself for a busy and exciting summer of traveling, competing, writing, and managing my business, I am more thankful than ever for the ability to get into my kayak, clear my mind, and work on the basics.It is an extremely cathartic way of re-centering.The forward stroke in a kayak is so simple… place blade in water, pull, and transfer energy to boat.  It is amazing how something so fundamental can keep us occupied for a lifetime of learning.  It doesn’t matter if you get on the river two weekends a year or if you are training for the Olympics in London this summer, that most basic of strokes can always be finessed or tweaked in some way.Similar to the subject of the Monogamy article in last month’s issue of Blue Ridge Outdoors, my local class II training rapids have seen me through a lot of different phases in my life.  My connection with it first began when I moved to this town, the place that I now hope to spend the rest of my life in.  Since then, those waters have helped me through the tribulations of getting an undergrad degree, dealing with failed relationships, losing loved ones, and struggling to make ends meet financially.  While helping me through the lows, that training ground has also been an enabler in the quest to be the athlete and individual that I want to be.  It represents thousands of hours of sweat, and constant dissection of every minute detail of paddling technique.  It feels good to reap the rewards of that effort when the stars align, and I have a strong showing in competition.I was speaking with a fellow paddler about this subject recently, and the conversation made me think about my sport a little bit differently.  When it comes down to it, a kayaker with a paddle is a nearly perfect union for power transfer from body to water.  The powerful core muscles of the human body allow incredible torque and power to be applied to that blade, and that makes it possible for paddlers to maneuver lithely around slalom gates or other obstacles, accelerate instantly to a sprint for short periods of time, or slow their stroke down to a sustainable metronome for 250+ mile paddles in 24 hours.Couple that with the ability to roll upright when capsized, and a low enough center of gravity to navigate seemingly impossible rapids, and you start to see why so many people are pulled in by the allure of running rivers in a kayak.But everything still hinges on that forward stroke.  The funny thing is that every kayaker still has their own individual style.  I could recognize many of my friends in completely foreign gear if I had to, simply due to the fact that I have seen how they move and deal with different obstacles that the river throws at them.Paddling a kayak is a constant refinement and self-discovery process, and taking things back to the basics is a humble acknowledgement that we still have much to learn.  The expression, “it’s about the journey, not the destination” could not ring more true here.Whatever your passion is, get outside this week and take it back to the fundamentals.  There’s always something new to learn.last_img read more

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Countering lawyers’ bad rap: All Bar Conference focuses on Dignity in Law

first_img February 1, 2003 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News Countering lawyers’ bad rap: All Bar Conference focuses on Dignity in Law Associate EditorRemember this scene from the 1997 movie “The Rainmaker”?Danny DeVito plays the feisty paralegal, Matt Damon plays the fresh young lawyer, and they are about to cruise the hospital looking for prospective clients, the more battered and injured, the better.When Damon’s young lawyer character looks alarmed, DeVito says: “What did they teach you in law school?”“Well, they didn’t teach me to chase ambulances.”“Well, you’d better learn quick — or you’ll starve.”DeVito seizes the opportunity of an accident victim strung up in traction. By the end of their quick, unannounced visit, DeVito gets the patient’s signature by moving a contract under the hand of the poor guy who can barely clench a pen with his broken arm stuck in a cast. The deal is sealed when DeVito sticks his business card in the patient’s mouth.“We came with nothing,” DeVito tells Damon on the way out of the hospital. “If he had thrown us out of the room, what would we have lost?”While that exaggerated scene can’t help but bring a few chuckles, what the legal profession loses with such Hollywood depictions of lawyers is some more of its precious dignity.What was gained from showing that film clip was sparking a lively discussion at the All Bar Conference January 16 in Miami about Dignity in Law, the first segment of the day-long session that included a panel discussion with members of the news media and tips from Christine Barney, CEO of rbb Public Relations, on how lawyers should deal with the media to get their message out.The benefit of the day’s events, said Alan Bookman, chair of the All Bar Conference, was exposure to the Dignity in Law program to members of voluntary bars, section leaders and chairs who need to get out and spread the word to their membership.“We have to remember that we are all lawyers, whether you practice tax law, whether you practice probate, trust and guardianship, we are all lawyers,” Bookman said. “We are, unfortunately, by a large segment of the public, put into the same barrel. We need to change that perception, because this is an honorable profession. And for some reason, the public doesn’t think so anymore. And we just need to change that, because we are often guided by what our clients want us to do. And unfortunately, some of our clients want us to be bulldogs, and want us to be obnoxious. The most obnoxious person wins. That’s not the way to practice law. You can get the same success and zealously represent your client and be professional.”But it’s the bulldogs that grab the headlines and inspire the starring roles in films.Second Judicial Circuit Judge Terry Lewis and Blan Teagle, director of The Florida Bar Center for Professionalism, used “The Rainmaker” film clip and others — including the comedy “My Cousin Vinny” and the classic Jimmy Stewart drama “Anatomy of a Murder” to illustrate how the powerful medium of films molds public perception about the legal profession. The idea of the interactive seminar, called “The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly: Lawyers and Popular Film,” was to challenge participants to determine what is professional behavior for lawyers, after viewing how the public sees them in the movies.Judge Lewis told the group he was influenced by the movies as a kid, and when he watched Perry Mason, he thought, “That guy is cool. I’d like to do that.. . . But then I realized all my clients wouldn’t be innocent, so I stayed away from criminal law.”When the DeVito character expresses a lawyer’s ethics, he sums it up as “Fight for your client, refrain from stealing, and try not to lie.”Judge Lewis asked seminar participants to list their own litmus test for ethics. Up on the poster board came this list: “What would Mom think? The Golden Rule. Would I open myself up for criticism, especially from the Bar? Would I mind if the news media reported it? Would it pass my ‘gut test’? Would my client approve? How does it mesh with what I’ve been taught by my faith? Would it withstand the ethical standards of my profession and community?”“I’m partial to the Golden Rule myself,” Judge Lewis said. “Obviously, Danny DeVito had his own moral compass.”Teagle admitted he was a bit naive when he graduated from law school and first went to work as a lawyer.“I didn’t realize it was a business. I knew it intellectually, but I didn’t understand it,” he said. Eventually, he said he understood that “yes, it is a business and a profession. It’s not either/or, but it must be kept in balance.”Board of Governors member David Bianchi of Miami made the point that only 20 percent of the public go to lawyers for litigation-related matters.“It’s what we just saw in the movie that is really how the entire profession is judged, even though it represents a small section of why people go to lawyers.. . The image of lawyers is being judged by a single digit (of lawyers who do unethical things). What are the few doing that hurts the many?” Don Horn, another board member from Miami, added: “Movies help mold and shape our image with the public. More people will see this movie than anything we produce in Dignity in Law. We can mold and shape by saying, ‘No, there are a whole lot of lawyers doing good things.’” Bar President Tod Aronovitz interjected that he is getting a lot of positive feedback about the Bar’s Dignity in Law program that is trying to spread the word about the good things that lawyers and judges do every day.“I also spent a lot of time with journalists and nonlawyers,” Aronovitz said. “And I am of the strong belief that mentoring is very, very important for this whole issue of professionalism. As recently as yesterday, I was talking to a respected journalist about why she isn’t covering this All Bar Conference. And she was talking to me about the courtesy and condescending conduct. And the reason she believes most lawyers are not received well or not perceived to be honest and reputable, is not because they are not honest, but because of the way they act toward other people.”Yet, when people get in trouble, they want an aggressive advocate, Judge Lewis said.“It’s very similar to your representatives in Congress,” Judge Lewis said. “They think Congress is the scum of the Earth, except for their own members, who get re-elected. They don’t like lawyers. They’re awful. But not mine. They want an aggressor, they want a son of a bitch for themselves.”Christopher Neilson, of the Broward County Bar Association, said advertising doesn’t help lawyers’ image. He said his wife, who is a nurse, was offended by an ad that said: “Call 1-800-PIT-BULL.”“The media portrays us as a Danny DeVito,” Neilson said. “We have to try to turn it around by developing a positive image that overcomes that. How we do that is one day at a time, one step at a time.” Countering lawyers’ bad rap: All Bar Conference focuses on Dignity in Lawlast_img read more

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Cybersecurity investment pays dividends three times over

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Plenty of standards documentation exist, including ISO and NIST. The NIST Model, which NCUA refers to in its Cybersecurity Resources, breaks it down into these five components: Building a sustainable cybersecurity program is crucial for credit unions, as 61% of cyberattacks are aimed at small- to mid-sized businesses, particularly financial institutions, according to the 2017 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report. Lack of a strong cybersecurity program can be disastrous financially and in terms of reputation risk.Companies looking to create cyberdefense programs must focus on 6 key areas:       Governance and Risk Management        Implementation and Design       User Authentication and Authorization       Prevention and Defense       Data Protection and Encryption       Monitoring and Responsecenter_img continue reading »last_img read more

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NAFCU meets with NCUA Chair Hood

first_img continue reading » NCUA Board Chairman Rodney Hood met with NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger at the association’s headquarters Wednesday to discuss priorities for the agency.“NAFCU thanks Chairman Hood for his leadership, and for taking the time to discuss regulatory burdens facing the industry and how our member credit unions would like to see them addressed,” Berger said. “We look forward to working with Chairman Hood, and NCUA Board Members [J. Mark] McWatters and [Todd] Harper, to ensure credit unions have a regulatory environment that allows them to grow and thrive.”Berger was joined by NAFCU Executive Vice President of Government Affairs and General Counsel Carrie Hunt and Director of Regulatory Affairs Ann Kossachev. From NCUA with Chairman Hood were Sarah Vega and Owen Cole. The group also recently met with Board member Harper. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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After humbling loss to South Florida, Syracuse volleyball looks to get on track versus Villanova

first_img Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 29, 2010 at 12:00 pm Contact Rachel: rnmarcus@syr.educenter_img The Syracuse volleyball team’s first loss to South Florida last weekend wasn’t the end of the world. The team came home this week, beat Binghamton and finds itself with an 18-1 record. But still, for middle blocker Samantha Hinz, looking back at last weekend hurts. ‘It was obviously disappointing,’ Hinz said. ‘No one wants to lose. We just weren’t really clicking. Teamwork was a little bit of an issue. We had a lot of personal errors. I feel like we could have done a lot better.’ But SU didn’t, and the result was a 3-2 loss to USF. Suddenly, the team with the record start looked vulnerable. And as the team prepares to travel to face Villanova on Sunday at 2 p.m. in the third game of Big East play, it is left piecing together what happened in its last conference game. Against USF, everything came to a halt for the Orange. SU’s program-best record to start a season, 17 wins and zero losses, was over. But most troubling of all, the Orange’s fundamentals unraveled. ‘Setting was off, we weren’t killing the ball, and we couldn’t dig,’ assistant coach Carol LaMarche said. ‘It was like a roller coaster ride. We lost the first set 25-22. Then we won the second set. Then boom we dropped in the third. Then we won the fourth. ‘AdvertisementThis is placeholder text LaMarche’s voice changed as she discussed the fifth and final set. ‘Then we dropped the fifth … bad,’ LaMarche said, her voice fading. So against Villanova, the Orange must start back at square one. Back to the basics, even if the team is 18-1. Because in Big East play, the team is just 1-1. Going into the Villanova game, the team will still be adjusting to the lineup changes it’s had to deal with the past three games. Against Georgetown last Friday, Ashley Williams, the team’s libero, was out. SU managed to win that match 3-1, but against USF Lindsay McCabe, another starter, played just two sets. And missing two starters against the Bulls proved to be too much for the Orange to overcome. Nothing seemed to go right in Tampa. Not even the simplest of tasks. ‘There’s no reason why we shouldn’t have been consistent (against USF),’ LaMarche said. ‘Everyone that was playing has been playing or has played and is capable of getting the job done. ‘It’s just like a domino effect. One person has a bad serve then the next person served it out. One person had a bad hit then the next person couldn’t kill the ball. It was frustrating and I think they panicked a little bit, because we hadn’t been in that position before. Hopefully we put it behind us and kind of settle down.’ If the team hopes to beat Villanova, then it will have to resemble the team that started the season 17-0, not the one that fell apart against USF. When the team faces the Wildcats, it will be playing its second match with the new lineup changes. But they will have to get used to the new lineup quickly, something that won’t be easy against a Big East opponent. ‘Villanova is definitely a strong team, and we have to come out in full force, get back into things, and find a way that we can click together again and really get ready for our third Big East game,’ outside hitter Erin Little said. That is the best option for the Orange right now. SU must focus on Villanova and feel confident about its win against Binghamton on Wednesday. The Orange can’t dwell on the past. Yes, their unblemished record is long gone. But there is no time to think about that. All eyes must be focused on conference play now. ‘I think everyone wants to move on from (the USF game),’ LaMarche said. ‘It’s good to know we’re vulnerable and we can’t just play any way we want to play, any way we feel like, and win. And the Big East does not let you do that. The stress of being undefeated is gone. But it’s replaced by the stress of Big East games.’ rnmarcus@syr.edulast_img read more

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Study shows benefits of aging research

first_imgA study led by the USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics and published in this month’s issue of the scientific journal Health Affairs found that allotting funds to delayed aging research rather than individualized disease research would save the United States $7.1 trillion over the next 50 years.The study, led by USC Schaeffer Director Dana Goldman, also included researchers from Harvard University, Columbia University and University of Illinois at Chicago. The analysts not only discovered the financial benefits of focusing on delayed aging research, but also found long-term effects these advances would have on population size. The amount of healthy adults over age 65 would increase by 5 percent per year, if more funds were spent on aging research.Goldman said that if research on delayed aging continues, eventually human bodies could look younger than their chronological ages.“People have long searched for the fountain of youth. We’re starting to understand at a basic cellular level how we accumulate age-related damage, the underlying biology of aging and the process of how cells grow, divide and age,” Goldman said.Goldman noted that medical researchers have often been victims of their own achievements since advancing in the treatment for one disease usually results in the propagation of another.“When we started looking into individual interventions for disease, we didn’t see the effect we thought we would. There were competing risks — if you save someone from one disease, they would end up getting something else,” Goldman said. “If we really want to make progress in expanding lifespan and healthy lives, we need to attack all diseases simultaneously. This is where delayed aging comes in.”The study found that individually delaying either cancer or heart disease would not do much for the overall disabled population. Employing delayed aging research, however, will boost the amount of healthy adults older than age 65 to 11.7 million, ensuring a higher quality of life into old age.Travis Eurick, a sophomore majoring in health promotion and disease prevention who researches Alzheimer’s disease at the USC Davis School of Gerontology, was not surprised to hear the findings.“Our culture definitely values the concept of youth, and as the baby boomers age, we will probably see [this research] take center stage,” Eurick said. “Research funding tends to be dispersed to fashionable topics, which I think could lead, and already has led, to increased research in aging.”Helen Ma, a sophomore majoring in international relations (global business), expressed some skepticism over the viability of a projected population size under delayed aging.“In order for us to effect these medical advances on society, our economic system would need to catch up fast. In its current state we wouldn’t be able to support such a top-heavy future population, considering that seniors are the fastest-growing age group to date,” Ma said.Not all students are proponents of the suggested switch of research funding from cancer studies to aging studies.“Even though delayed aging can make a big breakthrough in the medical field, I still believe funding cancer research is important; not all diseases manifest in old age,” said Crystal Tran, a sophomore majoring in biology.Goldman asserted that some opponents are not taking into account that a higher quality of life delays the aging process.“Some say, ‘Why would I want to live to 100, living to 80 is good enough.’ It’s the wrong view -— if you can give people healthy life, it’s in the better interest of society,” Goldman said.The study’s findings also offer new opportunities for students who are passionate about the field.“It’s definitely a field of study that’s important to delve into, and it makes me more aware that these sorts of studies will come up as I get older,” said Joseph Yoo, a sophomore majoring in biochemistry. “It’s honestly making me more excited for trying out research.”last_img read more

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Cal’s unique schemes are top concern for Trojans

first_imgMoving forward after this week’s traumatic event, USC now turns its attention to No. 24 California, whose balanced attack has the Trojans stepping up preparation on both sides of the ball.The Golden Bears’ pro-style 3-4 defensive alignment is an approach that takes special preparation, but for former Denver Broncos quarterback coach and USC’s current quarterback coach, Jeremy Bates, preparing for the attack is something he’s done before.Field vision · Matt Barkley will face a 3-4 defense for the first time in his college career when he takes on a Cal team looking to bounce back. – Dieuwertje Kast | Daily Trojan“Their 3-4 is something new, it definitely changes the focus a bit on the offensive side of the ball,” Bates said. “There are many different ways for [the defense] to blitz and pressure the quarterback. In the [NFL] the Patriots and the Chargers run it especially well.”Coach Pete Carroll also marveled at California’s 3-4 — although complex in formation and execution — mentioning how well the Golden Bears were able to run a defense so intricate and advanced while also running a successful offensive attack.“The more we look at them, the more we realized how balanced they are as a team — they do everything well,” Carroll said. “They are the lowest penalized team in the conference this season. We’re going to have to stay disciplined.”Led by quarterback Kevin Riley and running back Jahvid Best, the Bears’ offense features both a strong running and passing game which will put extra strain on the Trojan secondary.“Our secondary is good, they tackle well and cover well. If Jahvid gets loose, they’ll be our saving grace,” Carroll said.“Their whole offense is dangerous,” senior safety Taylor Mays said. “They always play us really tough. They know that they can take a shot against us, and they’re not intimidated.”uAlmost three weeks removed from the injury he suffered against Ohio State, freshman Matt Barkley continued to show improvement during practice.“Without a question it was the best day for his arm motion,” Carroll said. “It’s still not 100 percent, but even from yesterday to today, he’s better.”Practicing for the full week knowing he’d be the starter for the first time since before the matchup with the Buckeyes, Barkley impressed quarterbacks coach Bates yet again with his improvement.“Matt is getting better everyday. He’s throwing better than he’s thrown in the past two weeks,” Bates said.Redshirt freshman defensive end Nick Perry, the Pac-10 sack leader, returned to practice Wednesday after he was forced to sit out of practice Tuesday due to a knee bruise.“It’s [a] great return. He couldn’t even move yesterday,” Carroll said. “It’s a bruised knee. We just have to hope that it doesn’t get banged on, but I’m sure he’ll play on Saturday.”Junior wide receiver Ronald Johnson also returned to Howard Jones Field yesterday for the first time since he broke his collarbone, but was restricted to running on the side field for the day.last_img read more